Report on the organization and campaigns of the Army of the Potomac: to which is added an account of the campaign in western Virginia, with plans of battle-fields (Google eBook)

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Sheldon & Company, 1864 - Maryland Campaign, 1862 - 480 pages
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Page 146 - And allow me to ask, do you really think I should permit the line from Richmond, via Manassas Junction, to this city, to be entirely open, except what resistance could be presented by less than 20,000 unorganized troops? This is a question which the country will not allow me to evade.
Page 234 - I am now placed, General McDowell should wish the general interests to be sacrificed for the purpose of increasing his command. " If I cannot fully control all his troops, I want none of them, but would prefer to fight the battle with what I have, and let others be responsible for the results.
Page 173 - I suppose the whole force which has gone forward for you is with you by this time. And if so, I think it is the precise time for you to strike a blow. By delay, the enemy will relatively gain upon you — that is, he will gain faster by fortifications and reinforcements than you can by reinforcements alone. And once more let me tell you, it is indispensable to you that you strike a blow. I am powerless to help this.
Page 259 - I now know the full history of the day. On this side of the river (the right bank) we repulsed several strong attacks. On the left bank our men did all that men could do, all that soldiers could accomplish, but they were overwhelmed by vastly superior numbers, even after I brought my last reserves into action. The loss on both sides is terrible. I believe it will prove to be the most desperate battle of the war.
Page 172 - MY DEAR SIR. — Your dispatches complaining that you are not properly sustained, while they do not offend me, do pain me very much. " Blenker's division was withdrawn from you before you left here ; and you know the pressure under which I did it, and, as I thought, acquiesced in it — certainly not without reluctance.
Page 196 - York rivers, than by a land march. In order, therefore, to increase the strength of the attack upon Richmond, at the earliest moment, General McDowell has been ordered to march upon that city by the shortest route. He is ordered, keeping himself always in position to save the capital from all possible attack, so to operate, as to put his left wing in communication with your right, and you are instructed to cooperate, so as to establish this communication as soon as possible. By extending your right...
Page 172 - Your dispatches, complaining that you are not properly sustained, while they do not offend me, do pain me very much. " Blenker's division was withdrawn from you before you left here ; and you know the pressure under which I did it, and, as I thought, acquiesced in it— certainly not without reluctance. " After you left, I ascertained that less than twenty thousand unorganized men, without a single field battery, were all you designed to be left for the...
Page 356 - General Stuart will detach a squadron of cavalry to accompany the commands of Generals Longstreet, Jackson and McLaws, and, with the main body of the cavalry, will cover the route of the army, and bring up all stragglers that may have been left behind. " The commands of Generals Jackson, McLaws and Walker, after accomplishing the objects for which they have been detached, will join the main body of the army at Boonsboro
Page 302 - You say that the withdrawal from the present position will cause the certain demoralization of the army, " which is now in excellent discipline and condition." I can not understand why a simple change of position to a new and by no means distant base, will demoralize an army in excellent discipline, unless the officers themselves assist in that demoralization, which I am satisfied they will not. Your change of front from your extreme right at Hanover Court House to your present position was over...
Page 282 - Excellency, for your private consideration, my general views concerning the existing state of the rebellion, although they do not strictly relate to the situation of this army, or strictly come within the scope of my official duties.

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