Time's Telescope (Google eBook)

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Sherwood, Gilbert and Piper, 1821 - Almanacs, English
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Page 202 - Nature never did betray The heart that loved her; 'tis her privilege, Through all the years of this our life, to lead From joy to joy: for she can so inform The mind that is within us, so impress With quietness and beauty, and so feed With lofty thoughts, that neither evil tongues, Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men, Nor greetings where no kindness is, nor all The dreary intercourse of daily life, Shall e'er prevail against us, or disturb Our cheerful faith that all which we behold Is...
Page xxxii - Twas thine own genius gave the final blow, And helped to plant the wound that laid thee low. So the struck eagle, stretched upon the plain, No more through rolling clouds to soar again, Viewed his own feather on the fatal dart, And wing'd the shaft that quivered in his heart.
Page 152 - We walked in the evening in Greenwich park. He asked me, I suppose, by way of trying my disposition, " Is not this very fine?" Having no exquisite relish of the beauties of nature, and being more delighted with " the busy hum of men," I answered " Yes, sir ; but not equal to Fleet-street." JOHNSON. "You are right, sir.
Page 45 - The Niobe of nations ! there she stands, Childless and crownless, in her voiceless woe; An empty urn within her withered hands, Whose holy dust was scattered long ago; The Scipios...
Page 38 - In a small narrow cave, and begirt with cold clay, To the meanest of reptiles a peer and a prey. To BEAUTY ? Ah, no ! she forgets The charms which she wielded before ; Nor knows the foul worm that he frets The skin which but yesterday fools could adore For the smoothness it held, or the tint which it wore. Shall we build to the purple of PRIDE, The trappings which dizen the proud ? Alas ! they are all laid aside ; And here's neither dress nor adornment allow'd, But the long winding-sheet, and the...
Page 219 - It was by his inventions that its action was so regulated as to make it capable of being applied to the finest and most delicate manufactures, and its power so increased as to set weight and solidity at defiance. By his admirable...
Page 73 - ... in the Strand, giving them instructions at what rates to carry men into several parts of the town, where all day they may be had. Other hackney men seeing this way, they flocked to the same place, and perform their journeys at the same rate. So that sometimes there is twenty of them together, which disperse up and down, that they and others are to be had everywhere, as watermen are to be had by the waterside. Everybody is much pleased with it. For whereas before coaches could not be had but at...
Page lxii - Thence up he flew, and on the tree of life, The middle tree and highest there that grew, Sat like a cormorant...
Page 294 - Anon they'll think the house goes round : For they the cellar's depth have found, And there they will be merry. The wenches with their wassail bowls About the streets are singing ; The boys are come to catch the owls, The wild mare in is bringing.
Page 252 - Is not this the carpenter's son? is not his mother called Mary? and his brethren, James, and Joses, and Simon, and Judas? And his sisters, are they not all with us?

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