Walter Benjamin: Overpowering Conformism

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Pluto Press, May 20, 2000 - Literary Criticism - 298 pages
1 Review
Esther Leslie’s path-breaking study of Walter Benjamin is unlike any other book presently available in English on Benjamin, in seeking to make a case for a more politicised reading of Benjamin’s oeuvre. In looking at the entirety of Benjamin’s work - rather than the four or five essays available in English which tend to form the Benjamin ‘canon’ - Leslie offers powerful new insights into a key twentieth-century political thinker, correcting the post-structuralist bias that has characterised so much Benjamin scholarship, and repositioning Benjamin’s work in its historical and political context. In her examination of Benjamin’s commentary on the politics and aesthetics of technology - from Benjamin’s work on nineteenth-century industrial culture to his analyses of the Nazi deployment of the bomber - Esther Leslie recontextualises Benjamin’s writings in a lucid and cogently argued new study.
  

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Contents

Benjamins Objectives
42
Berlin Chthonic Photos and Trains and Films and Cars
63
Technik and Mirroring
89
Murmurs from Darkest Europe
123
Time for an Unnatural Death
168
Excavating and Remembering
208
Notes
236
Bibliography
276
Index
292
Copyright

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Cities and Cultures
Malcolm Miles
No preview available - 2007
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About the author (2000)

Esther Leslie is a lecturer in English and Humanities at Birkbeck College, University of London.

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