John Keats: A Literary Biography (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin, 1908 - 234 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
9
III
13
IV
17
V
21
VI
26
VII
32
VIII
37
XVI
101
XVII
110
XVIII
118
XIX
125
XX
130
XXI
137
XXII
149
XXIII
160

IX
43
X
51
XI
60
XII
69
XIII
77
XIV
84
XV
91
XXIV
165
XXV
178
XXVI
185
XXVII
200
XXVIII
208
XXIX
217
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 152 - She dwells with Beauty— Beauty that must die; And Joy, whose hand is ever at his lips Bidding adieu...
Page 223 - ... might I have invoked in song Descends on me; my spirit's bark is driven Far from the shore, far from the trembling throng Whose sails were never to the tempest given. The massy earth and sphered skies are riven! I am borne darkly, fearfully afar! Whilst, burning through the inmost veil of heaven, The soul of Adonais, like a star, Beacons from the abode where the Eternal are.
Page 69 - The imagination of a boy is healthy, and the mature imagination of a man is healthy ; but there is a space of life between, in which the soul is in a ferment, the character undecided, the way of life uncertain, the ambition thicksighted...
Page 205 - BRIGHT star ! would I were steadfast as thou art— Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night. And watching, with eternal lids apart. Like Nature's patient sleepless Eremite, The moving waters at their priestlike task Of pure ablution round earth's human shores...
Page 127 - The body of my brother's son Stood by me, knee to knee: The body and I pulled at one rope But he said nought to me. "I fear thee, ancient Mariner!
Page 179 - But eagles golden-feathered, who do tower Above us in their beauty, and must reign In right thereof; for 'tis the eternal law That first in beauty should be first in might: Yea, by that law, another race may drive Our conquerors to mourn as we do now.
Page 106 - The Genius of Poetry must work out its own salvation in a man. It cannot be matured by law and precept, but by sensation and watchfulness in itself. That which is creative must create itself.
Page 168 - Fall ! — No, by Tellus and her briny robes ! Over the fiery frontier of my realms I will advance a terrible right arm Shall scare that infant thunderer, rebel Jove, And bid old Saturn take his throne again.
Page 83 - That which is creative must create itself. In " Endymion" I leaped headlong into the sea, and thereby have become better acquainted with the soundings, the quicksands, and the rocks, than if I had stayed upon the green shore, and piped a silly pipe, and took tea and comfortable advice. I was never afraid of failure; for I would sooner fail than not be among the greatest.
Page 147 - ... but even now Thy voice was at sweet tremble in mine ear, Made tuneable with every sweetest vow ; And those sad eyes were spiritual and clear : How changed thou art ! how pallid, chill, and drear ! Give me that voice again, my Porphyro, Those looks immortal, those complainings dear ! Oh leave me not in this eternal woe, For if thou diest, my Love, I know not where to go.

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