James Joyce and German Theory: The Romantic School and All that (Google eBook)

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Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, 2004 - Literary Criticism - 174 pages
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James Joyce's aesthetic theories, as explicated by Stephen Dedalus in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and in the Scylla and Charybdis chapter of Ulysses, have generally been assumed to be grounded in Aristotle and Aquinas. Indeed, Stephen mentions those thinkers especially in Portrait, at the same time as he rejects Romantic notions. This book investigates the extent to which Joyce's theories as well as his practice, beginning with his critical writings and Stephen Hero, are indebted to early German Romanticism. The allusions, affinities, and analogies, as well as differential relationships between the Joycean oeuvre and texts of Johann Wolfgang Goethe, Friedrich Schiller, Friedrich Schiegel, and Novalis are often palpable, sometimes tentative, but clearly present in most of his works, including Finnegans Wake.
  

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Contents

IV
22
V
43
VI
62
VII
78
VIII
98
IX
113
X
136
XI
143
XII
161
XIII
168
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Page 27 - Streit und Spaltungen verursacht, ist urspriinglich von mir und Schiller ausgegangen. Ich hatte in der Poesie die Maxime des objektiven Verfahrens und wollte nur dieses gelten lassen. Schiller aber, der ganz subjektiv wirkte, hielt seine Art

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