Margaret Moncrieffe; the First Love of Aaron Burr: A Romance of the Revolution (Google eBook)

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Derby & Jackson, 1802 - Ciphers - 437 pages
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Page 38 - When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept: Ambition should be made of sterner stuff: Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man. You all did see, that on the Lupercal, I thrice presented him a kingly crown, Which he did thrice refuse.
Page 49 - It is highly improbable that I shall have an equal number of votes with Mr. Jefferson ; but if such should be the result, every man who knows me ought to know that I would utterly disclaim all competition.
Page 50 - ... utterly disclaim all competition. Be assured that the Federal party can entertain no wish for such an exchange. As to my friends, they would dishonor my views and insult my feelings, by a suspicion that I would submit to be instrumental in counteracting the wishes and the expectations of the people of the United States. And I now constitute you my proxy to declare these sentiments, if the occasion shall require.
Page 32 - In retracing his steps, we see nothing to applaud, and less to admire. . . . Throughout there appears a winding, a convenient versatility, a species of refined cunning." He moved like a serpent, and "in his conduct there is nothing amiable, disinterested, magnanimous or patriotic. . . . Selfishness impelled him to action.
Page 41 - he had fixed his basilisk eyes on the Presidency; and in the fulness of his sanguine disposition he entertained a hope that, by able management, he might fill that office before Mr. Jefferson, to whom it was exclusively alloted by the people. . . . Mr. Burr seems to have carried on a secret correspondence with the federalists from the period of his nomination. . . . Fortune had been so kind to Mr. Burr that he was lavish of her favours and sported with her bounties.
Page 87 - April last, did propose to the citizens of this state, to elect by ballot delegates to meet in convention, "for the purpose of considering the parts of the Constitution of this state respecting the number of senators and members of assembly in this state, and with power to reduce and limit the number of them as the said convention...
Page 87 - State to elect by ballot delegates to meet in convention, "for the purpose of considering the parts of the constitution of this State respecting the number of senators and members of assembly in this State, and with power to reduce and limit the number of them as the said convention might deem proper: and also for the purpose of considering and determining the true construction of the twenty-third article of the constitution of this State, relative to the right of nomination to office...
Page 50 - Jefferson; but if such should be the result, every man who knows me ought to know that I would utterly disclaim all competition. Be assured that the Federal party can entertain no wish for such an exchange. As to my friends...
Page 74 - But the Colonel had expressed his disapprobation of such public flatteries, and Mr. Cheetham was in a fury. "It was not to be expected," he wrote, "that Mr. Jefferson . . . would be guilty of so palpable a violation of the laws of decorum. . . . Mr. Burr, however, was pleased to take another course. He would not be so unlike a Republican as to answer addresses. There was some art in this; it might catch a few easy gulls ... at AARON BURR From the original portrait hy Vanderlyn in the possession of...
Page 32 - ... published View of the Political Conduct of Aaron Burr, in which all of the Colonel's political iniquities were elaborately and whimsically reviewed. In fact, in his long public career, he had never performed a single act worthy of Republican approval with the exception of his stand against the Jay treaty. "In retracing his steps, we see nothing to applaud, and less to admire. . . . Throughout there appears a winding, a convenient versatility, a species of refined cunning.

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