The Forsaken: An American Tragedy in Stalin's Russia

Front Cover
Penguin, 2008 - History - 436 pages
31 Reviews
A remarkable piece of forgotten history—the story of how thousands of Americans were lured to Soviet Russia by the promise of jobs and better lives only to meet a tragic, and until now forgotten, end

The Forsaken starts with a photograph of a baseball team. The year is 1934, the image black and white: two rows of young men, one standing, the other crouching with their arms around one anotherÂ's shoulders. They are all somewhere in their late teens or twenties, in the peak of health. We know most, if not all, of their names: Arthur Abolin, Walter Preeden, Victor Herman, Eugene Peterson. They hail from ordinary working families from across America—Detroit, Boston, New York, San Francisco. Waiting in the sunshine, they look just like any other baseball team except, perhaps, for the Russian lettering on their uniforms.

These men and thousands of others, their wives, and children were possibly the least heralded migration in American history. Not surprising, maybe, since in a nation of immigrants few care to remember the ones who leave behind the dream. The exiles came from all walks of life. Within their ranks were Communists, trade unionists, and radicals of the John Reed school, but most were just ordinary citizens not overly concerned were politics. What united them was the hope that drives all emigrants: the search for a better life. And to any one of the millions of unemployed Americans during the Great Depression, even the harshest Moscow winter could sustain that promise.

Within four years of that June day in Gorky Park, many of the young men in that photograph will be arrested and along with them unaccounted numbers of their fellow countrymen. As foreign victims of StalinÂ's Terror, some will be executed immediately in basement cells or at execution grounds outside the main cities. Others will be sent to the “corrective labor” camps, where they will be starved and worked to death, their bodies buried in the snowy wasteland. Two of the baseball players who survive and whose stories frame this remarkable work of history will be inordinately lucky. This book is the story of these mensÂ' lives—The Forsaken who lived and those who died.

The result of years of groundbreaking research in American and Russian archives, The Forsaken is also the story of the world inside Russia at the time of Terror: the glittering obliviousness of the U.S. embassy in Moscow, the duplicity of the Soviet government in its dealings with Roosevelt, and the terrible finality of the Gulag system. In the tradition of the finest history chronicling genocide in the twentieth century, The Forsaken offers new understanding of timeless questions of guilt and innocence that continue to plague us today.
  

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Review: The Forsaken: An American Tragedy in Stalin's Russia

User Review  - Michael Flanagan - Goodreads

Scarier than any Orwellian novel, The Forsaken takes us on a journey into the terror that was unleashed upon Russia by Stalin. The author follows the Americans that were lured to the USSR by the ... Read full review

Review: The Forsaken: An American Tragedy in Stalin's Russia

User Review  - Jason Fish - Goodreads

I read this book at request of my grandmother who remarkably survived a GULAG in the 1940's. Before reading this book, I naively would tell my grandmother, "At least you weren't in a German camp." In ... Read full review

Contents

The Joads of Russia
1
Baseball in Gorky Park
12
Life Has Become More Joyful
23
Fordizatsia
30
The Lindbergh of Russia
38
The Captured Americans
48
The Arrival of Spring
61
The Terror the Terror
78
The American Brands of a Soviet Genocide
203
An American Vice President in
215
To See Cruelty and Burn Not
228
Release by the Green Procurator
247
The Second Generation
258
Awakening
274
Citizen of the United States of America
286
Smert Stal1na Spaset Ross11u
307

Spetzrabota
93
IB A Dispassionate Observer
108
Send Views of New York
122
Submission to Moscow
137
Kolyma Znaczit Smert
148
H The Soviet Gold Rush
160
IS Our Selfless Labor Will Restore
173
IB June 221941
187
Freedom and Deceit
317
The Truth at Last
336
The Two Russias
351
Thomas Sgovio Redux
360
Bibliography
399
Index
417
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Born in Athens, Timotheos Tzouliadis was raised in England. A graduate of Oxford, he subsequently pursued a career as a documentary filmmaker and television journalist whose work has appeared on NBC and National Geographic television.

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