Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

Front Cover
Wordsworth Editions, 1995 - History - 724 pages
5 Reviews
Whenever struck by campaigns, fads, cults and fashions, the reader may take some comfort that Charles Mackay can demonstrate historical parallels for almost every neurosis of our times. The South Sea Bubble, Witch Mania, Alchemy, the Crusades, Fortune-telling, Haunted Houses, and even 'Tulipomania' are only some of the subjects covered in this book, which is given a contemporary perspective through Professor Norman Stone's lively new Introduction.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
4
4 stars
0
3 stars
1
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

User Review  - Pinar - Goodreads

I really enjoy reading history books and this is no exception eventhough it is a classical investment book. Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds is a very old and also very contemporary book. Easy to read and enjoy. Read full review

Review: Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

User Review  - Lois Bujold - Goodreads

It's been too long since I've read this, but there's a reason it's been in print since 1841. Among other things, it has a classic account of the Dutch tulip mania, one of the first (but far from the ... Read full review

Contents

THE MISSISSIPPI SCHEME
1
THE SOUTHSEA BUBBLE
46
THE TULIPOMANIA
91
Introductory remarksPretended antiquity of the atGeter
256
FORTUNETELLING
281
THE MAGNETISERS
304
Revolution of 1830The King of Bavaria 1838 orders
346
Different accounts of the Crusaders derived from History
463
THE SLOW POISONERS
565
HAUNTED HOUSES
593
Cant phrasesQuozWhat a shocking bad hatHookey
619
POPULAR ADMIRATION OF GREAT THIEVES
632
Robin HoodClaude DuvalDick TurpinJonathan WildJack
646
The True CrossTears of our SaviourThe Santa Scala or Holy
695
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1995)

Charles Mackay (1841-1889) was born in Perth, Scotland. His mother died shortly after his birth, and his father, who had been in turn a Lieutenant on a Royal Navy sloop (captured and imprisoned for four years in France) and then an Ensign in the 47th foot taking part in the ill-fated Walcheren Expedition where he contracted malaria, sent young Charles to live with a nurse in Woolwich in 1822. After a couple of years' education in Brussels from 1828-1830, he became a journalist and songwriter in London. He worked on The Morning Chronicle from 1835-1844, when he was appointed Editor of The Glasgow Argus. His song The Good Time Coming sold 400,000 copies in 1846, the year that he was awarded his Doctorate of Literature by Glasgow University. He was a friend of influential figures such as Charles Dickens and Henry Russell, and moved to London to work on The Illustrated London News in 1848, and he became Editor of it in 1852. He was a correspondent for The Times during the American Civil War, but thereafter concentrated on writing books. Apart from Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds, he is best remembered for his songs and his Dictionary of Lowland Scotch.

Bibliographic information