Catalogue and Circular, Volumes 2-14 (Google eBook)

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Page xxvii - spur that the clear spirit doth raise (That last infirmity of noble mind) To scorn delights and live laborious days; But the fair guerdon when we hope to find, And think to burst out into sudden blaze, Comes the blind Fury with the abhorred shears, And slits the thin-spun life.
Page 24 - Come, let us plant the apple-tree: Cleave the tough greensward with the spade; Wide let its hollow bed be made; There gently lay the roots, and there Sift the dark mould with kindly care,
Page 69 - Near yonder copse where once the garden smiled. And still where many a garden flower grows wild, There, where a
Page ix - School is strictly professional; that is, to prepare in the best possible manner the pupils for the work of organizing, governing, and teaching the public schools of the Commonwealth. " To this end there must be the most thorough knowledge, first, of the branches of
Page xvii - TERM. 1. Arithmetic, oral and written, begun. 2. Geometry, begun. 3. Chemistry. 4. Grammar, and Analysis of the English Language. SECOND TERM. 1. Arithmetic, completed; Algebra, begun. 2. Geometry, completed; Geography and History, begun. 3. Physiology and Hygiene. 4. Grammar and Analysis, completed. 5. Lessons once or twice a week in Botany and Zoology.
Page 24 - press it o'er them tenderly, As round the sleeping infant's feet We softly fold the cradle-sheet: So plant we the apple-tree.
Page 6 - The Board of Education, by a vote passed May 6, 1880, stated the design of the school, and the course of studies for the State Normal Schools, as follows : — "The design of the Normal School is strictly professional; that is, to prepare in the best possible manner the pupils for the work of organizing, governing and
Page xix - blackboard; vocal music; spelling, with derivations and definitions; reading, including analysis of sounds and vocal gymnastics; and writing. The Latin and French languages may be pursued as optional studies, but not to the neglect of the English course. General exercises in composition, gymnastics, object lessons, &c, to be conducted in such a manner and at 'such times as the

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