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Books Books 1 - 10 of 180 on Wit, abstracted from its effects upon the hearer, may be more rigorously and philosophically....  
" Wit, abstracted from its effects upon the hearer, may be more rigorously and philosophically considered as a kind of discordia concors: a combination of dissimilar images, or discovery of occult resemblances in things apparently unlike. "
Elementary Sketches of Moral Philosophy: Delivered at the Royal Institution ... - Page 117
by Sydney Smith - 1850 - 391 pages
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The Life of Edmund Burke: Comprehending and Impartial Account of ..., Volume 1

Robert Bisset - 1800
...wit, according to Johnson's definition of that term, which agrees with its received acceptation: ' A combination of dissimilar images, or discovery of...occult resemblances in things apparently unlike.' At the same time, although it may appear from Burke's works., that he abounded in wit much more VOL....
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Lives

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1800
...the hearer, may be more rigorously' and philosophically considered as a kind of dtsearetia cancan \ a combination of dissimilar images, or discovery of occult resemblances in things apparently ijniikc. Of wit, thus defined, they have more than eriough. The most het«ro»ciyxras ideas are yoked...
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The works of the poets of Great Britain and Ireland. With prefaces ...

Great Britain - 1804
...upon the hearer, may be more rigorously and philosophically considered as a kind of £scordla cancan ; a combination of dissimilar images, or discovery of occult resemblances in things apparently unlike. Of wit, thus defined, they have more than enough. The most heterogeneous ideas are yoked by violence...
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The Eclectic review. vol. 1-New [8th]

1850
...moreover, makes the definition too wide, and quickness of comparison too narrow. ' Wit,' says Johnson, ' is a combination of dissimilar images, or discovery of...occult resemblances in things apparently unlike.' To which our author objects, that if it be true, the discovery of the resemblance between diamond and...
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The works of Abraham Cowley, Volume 1

Abraham Cowley, Samuel Johnson, John Aikin - English literature - 1806
...the hearer, may be more rigorously and philosophically considered as a kind of discordia concors ; a combination of dissimilar images, or discovery of occult resemblances in things apparently unlike. Of wit, thus defined, they have more than enough. The most heterogeneous ideas are yoked by violence...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, Volume 10

Samuel Johnson - English literature - 1806
...upon the hearer, may be more rigorously and philosophically considered as a kind of dlscordia concurs; a combination of dissimilar images, or discovery of occult resemblances in things apparently unlike. Of wit, thus defmed, they have more than enough. The most heterogeneous ideas are yoked by violence...
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Observations on our principal dramatic authors. The school for husbands, a ...

James Mason - 1809
...it, wonders how he missed." " Abstracted from its effects upon the hearer, it may be more vigorously and philosophically considered as a kind of concordia discors ; a combination of dissimilar images, or discoveiy of occult resemblances in things apparently unlike."* Now to come to a conception of humour,...
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The Works of Mr. A. Cowley: In Prose and Verse, Volume 1

Abraham Cowley, Richard Hurd, Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1809
...the hearer, may be more rigorously and philosophically considered as a kind of discordia concurs ; a combination of dissimilar images, or discovery of...-occult resemblances in things apparently unlike. Of wit, thus defined, they have more than enough. The most heterogeneous ideas are yoked by violence...
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The works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: With An essay on his life and ..., Volume 9

Samuel Johnson - 1810
...the hearer, ; may be more rigorously and philosophically considered as a kind of discordia concors; a combination of dissimilar images, or discovery of occult resemblances in things apparently unlike. Of wit, thus denned, they have more than enough. The most heterogeneous ideas are yoked by violence...
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The Works of the English Poets, from Chaucer to Cowper, Volume 7

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1810
...upon the hearer, may be more rigorously and philosophically considered as a kind of discordia concors, a combination of dissimilar images, or discovery of occult resemblances in things apparently unlike. Of wit, thus defined, they have more than enough. The most heterogeneous ideas are yoked by violence...
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