Expert and Novice Performance in an Industrial Engineering Virtual World Simulation

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Universal-Publishers, Feb 22, 2007 - Business & Economics
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Expert and novice problem solving has been a subject of research for many years. Problem solving of textbook problems and case studies in various domains such as math, physics, chess, music, system design, medical diagnosis, and business sub-domains have been the norm as the subject of this type of research. Few if any research efforts have undertaken the study of real world problem solving that occurs over an extended time such as those solved by industrial engineers in a manufacturing setting. This research studies the expert and novice problem solving performance in a scaled-world simulation of a manufacturing company experiencing a high backlog of customer orders. Research time consists of eight hours of problem solving behavior for teams of two as they diagnose the problem and make decisions to meet the problem goal. Participants can advance simulation time forward for weeks to get feedback on their decisions. The seven research hypotheses are: 1) experts will generate a better outcome for the primary problem goal in the test situation in the given time period than novices; 2) experts will make more correct decisions in solving the problem in the test situation than novices; 3) experts will understand the system dynamics of the problem in the test situation better than novices; 4) experts will search for data and situation information better than novices in solving the problem in the test situation; 5) experts will recognize and use data and situation information better than novices in solving the problem in the test situation; 6) experts will use more domain knowledge than novices in solving the problem in the test situation; and, 7) experts will use a forward or top-down problem solving method and novices will use a backward or bottom-up problem solving method. The experimental results support all seven research hypotheses. Discussion ensues about the unexpected results such as fixation on scheduling. The conclusions are that the research simulation discriminates between novice and expert performance which indicates its potential for measuring levels of industrial engineering expertise. Suggestions for future research with the scaled-world simulation and its use in the classroom are given.
  

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Contents

Theoretical Background
18
Research Methodology
51
LIST OF TABLES
60
Sample drawing of F90 of the PlastBrack product line
62
Sample process flow of bulk packed product BF90
63
Display information and decision inputs by location
64
Virtual Industrial Engineering Office
65
Informal Argument Structure Toulmin 1958
73
MLD100 production data
160
Welcome and introduction
161
Industrial Engineering office
162
Swensons area and MLD100 shop floor
163
Divovichs office
164
Lunds office
165
Monnins office
166
Perkins office
167

Results86
86
Final backlog amount
88
Summary of decisions made
89
Percent of CORs accessed by time of 1st of access
91
Summary of hypothesis tests and acceptance of research hypotheses
96
Conclusions
105
Appendices
121
Initial basic system diagram
124
Final basic system diagram
125
Complete system dynamics diagram
126
ISE core curriculum and concept coverage
147
B The Excellent Manufacturing Simulation
149
EMC top level organization chart
152
EMC support service organization chart
153
General plant layout
154
Sample product drawing F90
155
Sample product process BF90
156
Bilboas office
168
MLD100 production by part number
169
M102 production by part number
170
M104 production by part number
171
P120A production assembly and rejects
172
P100 production assembly and rejects
173
P120B production assembly and rejects
174
weekly finished goods produced by part number
175
M101 downtime by week
176
time study forM103 setup procedure
177
Research Methodology178
178
Canonical Solutions And Process Tracing Coding Scheme190
190
Sensitivity results of optimizing solution
199
Goal Hierarchy Part 1
212
E Statistical Analysis Results Detailed Report213
213
References224
224
Copyright

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