An Introduction to Entomology: Or, Elements of the Natural History of Insects: Comprising an Account of Noxious and Useful Insects, of Their Metamorphoses, Food, Stratagems, Habitations, Societies, Motions, Noises, Hybernation, Instinct, Etc., Etc. With Plates (Google eBook)

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Lea and Blanchard, 1846 - Insects - 600 pages
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Page 164 - A day of darkness and of gloominess, a day of clouds and of thick darkness, as the morning spread upon the mountains: a great people and a strong; there hath not been ever the like, neither shall be any more after it, even to the years of many generations.
Page 327 - Some to the sun their insect-wings unfold, Waft on the breeze, or sink in clouds of gold ; Transparent forms, too fine for mortal sight, Their fluid bodies half...
Page 164 - But I will remove far off from you the northern army, and will drive him into a land barren and desolate, with his face toward the east sea, and his hinder part toward the utmost sea, and his stink shall come up, and his ill savour shall come up, because he hath done great things.
Page 626 - Kirby and Spence's Introduction to Entomology ; or, Elements of the Natural History of Insects : Comprising an Account of Noxious and Useful Insects, of their Metamorphoses, Food, Stratagems, Habitations, Societies, Motions, Noises, Hybernation, Instinct, &c.
Page 164 - Like the noise of chariots on the tops of mountains shall they leap, like the noise of a flame of fire that devoureth the stubble, as a strong people set in battle array.
Page 362 - A similar engagement between great and small ants is recorded by Olaus Magnus, in which the small ones, being victorious, are said to have buried the bodies of their own soldiers, but left those of their giant enemies a prey to the birds. This event happened previous to the expulsion of the tyrant Christiern the Second from Sweden.
Page 164 - A fire devoureth before them ; and behind them a flame burneth : the land is as the garden of Eden before them, and behind them a desolate wilderness ; yea, and nothing shall escape them.
Page 604 - ... sense, the soar of thought, Now vainly asks the scenes she left behind; Its orb so full, its vision so confined! Who guides the patient pilgrim to her cell ? Who bids her soul with conscious triumph swell ? With conscious truth retrace the mazy clue Of varied scents, that charmed her as she flew ? Hail, MEMORY, hail! thy universal reign Guards the least link of Being's glorious chain.
Page 58 - There is my friend the Weaver : strong desires Reign in his breast ; 'tis beauty he admires ; See ! to the shady grove he wings his way, And feels in hope the raptures of the day Eager he looks ; and soon, to glad his eyes, From the sweet bower, by nature form'd, arise Bright troops of virgin moths and fresh-born butterflies ; Who broke that morning from their half-year's sleep, To fly o'er flowers where they were wont to creep.
Page 43 - A universe of death ; which God by curse Created evil, for evil only good, Where all life dies, death lives, and nature breeds, Perverse, all monstrous, all prodigious things, Abominable, inutterable, and worse Than fables yet have feign'd, or fear conceiv'd, Gorgons, and Hydras, and Chimeras dire.

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