Ghosts of Tsavo: Stalking the Mystery Lions of East Africa

Front Cover
National Geographic Books, Jun 1, 2003 - Nature - 275 pages
16 Reviews
A classic, prize-winning novel about an epic migration and a lone woman haunted by the past in frontier Waipu. In the 1850s, a group of settlers established a community at Waipu in the northern part of New Zealand. They were led there by a stern preacher, Norman McLeod. The community had followed him from Scotland in 1817 to found a settlement in Nova Scotia, then subsequently to New Zealand via Australia. Their incredible journeys actually happened, and in this winner of the New Zealand Book Awards, Fiona Kidman breathes life and contemporary relevance into the facts by creating a remarkable fictional story of three women entangled in the migrations - Isabella, her daughter Annie and granddaughter Maria. McLeod's harsh leadership meant that anyone who ran counter to him had to live a life of secrets. The 'secrets' encapsulated the spirit of these women in their varied reactions to McLeod's strict edicts and connect the past to the present and future.
  

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Review: Ghosts of Tsavo: Stalking the Mystery Lions of East Africa

User Review  - Gavin - Goodreads

This is a shame. What starts as a fascinating account of the lions of Tsavo and their predilection for man eating quickly becomes the wandering, directionless travelogue of a tourist. The first few ... Read full review

Review: Ghosts of Tsavo: Stalking the Mystery Lions of East Africa

User Review  - Edward Sullivan - Goodreads

An interesting, sometimes gripping, mix of travelogue, science, history, and mystery in which Caputo attempts to separate reality from myth as he investigates stories of maneless, man-eating lions in East Africa. Read full review

Contents

PROLOGUE
 
ACT ONE
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

INTERMISSION
 
ACT TWO
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
EPILOGUE
 
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Philip Caputo was born on June 10, 1941 in Chicago, Illinois. He received a B.A. from Loyola University in 1964. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1964 to 1967. His first book, A Rumor of War (1977), recounts his military tour of Vietnam. He has written more than fifteen books including Horn of Africa, Indian Country, Equation for Evil, Crossers, and The Longest Road. His journalism career began in 1968, when he joined the staff of the Chicago Tribune, serving as a general assignment and team investigative reporter until 1972 and then as a foreign correspondent for the next five years. In 1972 he and Hugh Jones received a Pulitzer Prize for their coverage of election fraud in the primaries. He has also written for the New York Times, Washington Post, the Boston Globe, the Los Angeles Times, and many other publications. He has worked as a screenwriter for Paramount Pictures and Michael Douglas Productions.

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