Shakespeare's Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice (Google eBook)

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American Book Company, 1898 - Promptbooks - 216 pages
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Page 52 - She'd come again, and with a greedy ear Devour up my discourse: which I observing, Took once a pliant hour; and found good means To draw from her a prayer of earnest heart That I would all my pilgrimage dilate...
Page 80 - His soul is so enfetter'd to her love, That she may make, unmake, do what she list, Even as her appetite shall play the god With his weak function. How am I then a villain To counsel Cassio to this parallel course, Directly to his good? Divinity of hell! When devils will the blackest sins put on, They do suggest at first with heavenly shows...
Page 39 - It is as sure as you are Roderigo, Were I the Moor, I would not be lago: In following him, I follow but myself; Heaven is my judge, not I for love and duty, But seeming so, for my peculiar end...
Page 91 - Good name in man and woman, dear my lord, Is the immediate jewel of their souls : Who steals my purse steals trash ; 'tis something, nothing ; "Twas mine, 'tis his, and has been slave to thousands ; But he that filches from me my good name Robs me of that which not enriches him, And makes me poor indeed.
Page 120 - I should have found in some part of my soul A drop of patience : but (alas !) to make me A fixed figure, for the time of scorn To point his slow unmoving finger at...
Page 59 - s see : After some time, to abuse Othello's ear That he is too familiar with his wife : He hath a person, and a smooth dispose, To be suspected ; fram'd to make women false. The Moor is of a free and open nature, That thinks men honest that but seem to be so ; And will as tenderly be led by the nose As asses are. I have 't ; it is engender'd : hell and night Must bring this monstrous birth to the world's light.
Page 97 - The spirit-stirring drum, the ear-piercing fife, The royal banner ; and all quality. Pride, pomp, and circumstance of glorious war ! And O, you mortal engines, whose rude throats The immortal Jove's dread clamours counterfeit, Farewell ! Othello's occupation's gone ! lago.
Page 32 - As I am an honest man, I thought you had received some bodily wound ; there is more offence in that than in reputation. Reputation is an idle and most false imposition ; oft got without merit, and lost without deserving : you have lost no reputation at all, unless you repute yourself such a loser.
Page 148 - When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, Speak of me as I am ; nothing extenuate, Nor set down aught in malice: then must you speak Of one that...
Page 52 - I did consent, And often did beguile her of her tears When I did speak of some distressful stroke That my youth suffer'd. My story being done, She gave me for my pains a world of sighs; She swore, in faith, 'twas strange, 'twas passing strange; Twas pitiful, 'twas wondrous pitiful.

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