Forty Years Among the Indians: A True Yet Thrilling Narrative of the Author's Experiences Among the Natives (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Juvenile instructor office, 1890 - Frontier and pioneer life - 400 pages
3 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: 40 Years Among the Indians

User Review  - Rachel - Goodreads

A Mormon convert in early Utah history and advocate throughout his adult life for the Native Americans, this autobiography truly was a remarkable read. Unfortunately as a modest autobiography I found ... Read full review

Review: 40 Years Among the Indians

User Review  - William - Goodreads

This was such a great book. I loved every page. I would recommend to anyone. The author relates interesting stories regarding American Indians, Mexicans, and early Mormon history in Utah. Read full review

Contents

I
17
II
20
III
37
IV
40
V
43
VI
45
VII
47
VIII
51
XXIX
189
XXX
195
XXXI
203
XXXII
211
XXXIII
214
XXXIV
219
XXXV
233
XXXVI
240

IX
53
X
59
XI
62
XII
65
XIII
69
XIV
75
XV
80
XVI
86
XVII
96
XVIII
102
XIX
109
XX
115
XXI
124
XXII
131
XXIII
138
XXIV
147
XXV
156
XXVI
161
XXVII
169
XXVIII
177
XXXVII
249
XXXVIII
256
XXXIX
266
XL
273
XLI
280
XLII
288
XLIII
294
XLIV
300
XLV
304
XLVI
309
XLVII
315
XLVIII
325
XLIX
331
L
337
LI
344
LII
352
LIII
360
LIV
363
LV
372
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 53 - They (Walker's band) were in the habit of raiding on the Pahutes and low tribes, taking their children prisoners and selling them. Next year when they came up and camped on the Provo bench, they had some Indian children for sale. They offered them to the Mormons who declined buying. Arapine, Walker's brother, became enraged saying that the Mormons had stopped the Mexicans from buying these children; that they had no right to do so, unless they bought them themselves.
Page 49 - Navajoes or Utes (generally with the Navajoes) for horses, which they sold very cheap, always retaining their best ones. These used-up horses were brought through and traded to the poorer Indians for children.
Page 68 - A condition of distress," writes Jones, "here met my eyes that I never saw before or since. The train was strung out for three or four miles. There were old men pulling and tugging their carts, sometimes loaded with a sick wife or children - women pulling along sick husbands - little children six to eight years old struggling through the mud and snow. As night came on the mud would freeze on their clothes and feet. There were two of us, and hundreds needing help. What could we do? We gathered on...
Page 49 - Navajoes) for horses, which they sold very cheap, always retaining their best ones. These used-up horses were brought through and traded to the poorer Indians for children. . . . This trading was continued into Lower California, where the children bought on the down trip would be traded to the Mexican-Californians for other horses, goods or cash.
Page 52 - The Mexicans listened with respect, admitting that the traffic would have to cease. It was plainly shown to them that it was a cruel business which could not be tolerated any longer ; but as it had been an old established practice, they were not so much to blame for following the traffic heretofore. Now it was expected that this business would be discontinued. All seemed satisfied and pledged their words that they would return to their homes without trading for children. Most of them kept their promise,...
Page 50 - The girls were in demand to bring up for house servants, having the reputation of making better servants than any others. This slave trade gave rise to the cruel wars between the native tribes of this country, from Salt Lake down to the tribes in southern Utah. Walker and his band raided the weak tribes, taking their children prisoners and selling them to the Mexicans. Many of the lower classes, inhabiting the southern deserts, would sell their children for a horse and kill and eat the horse. We...
Page 265 - I have often observed in the course of my experience that every man, even the worst, has something good about him, though very often nothing else than a happy temperament of constitution inclining him to this or that virtue. For this reason, no man can say in what degree any other person, besides himself, can be with strict justice called wicked. Let any of the strictest character for regularity of conduct among...
Page 69 - This was a bitter, cold night and we had no fuel except very small sage brush. Several died that night. Next morning, Brother Young having come up, we three started for our camp near Devil's Gate. All were rejoiced to get the news that we had found the emigrants. The following morning most of the company moved down, meeting the hand-cart company at Greasewood creek. Such assistance as we could give was rendered to all until they finally arrived at Devil's Gate fort about the ist of November.
Page 50 - These used-up horses were brought through and traded to the poorer Indians for children. The horses were often used for food. This trading was continued into Lower California, where the children bought on the down trip would be traded to the Mexican-Californians for other horses, goods or cash. Many times a small outfit on the start would return with large herds of California stock. All children bought on the return trip would be taken back to New Mexico and then sold, boys fetching on an average...
Page 69 - The winter storms had now set in in all their severity. The provisions we took amounted to almost nothing among so many people, many of them now on very short rations, some almost starving. Many were dying daily from exposure and want of food. The company was composed of average emigrants; old, middle-aged and young women and children. The men seemed to be failing and dying faster than the women and children. The hand-cart company was moved over to a cove in the mountains for shelter and fuel; a...

Bibliographic information