Political Transformations and Public Finances: Europe, 16501913 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Sep 26, 2011 - Business & Economics
0 Reviews
How did today's rich states first establish modern fiscal systems? To answer this question, Political Transformations and Public Finances by Mark Dincecco examines the evolution of political regimes and public finances in Europe over the long term. The book argues that the emergence of efficient fiscal institutions was the result of two fundamental political transformations that resolved long-standing problems of fiscal fragmentation and absolutism. States gained tax force through fiscal centralization and restricted ruler power through parliamentary limits, which enabled them to gather large tax revenues and channel funds toward public services with positive economic benefits. Using a novel combination of descriptive, case study and statistical methods, the book pursues this argument through a systematic investigation of a new panel database that spans eleven countries and four centuries. The book's findings are significant for our understanding of economic history and have important consequences for current policy debates.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Weak and Strong States in Historical Perspective
1
2 Gaining Force
10
3 Restricting Power
24
4 Political Regimes and Credit Risk
32
5 Two Mechanisms
43
6 Letting the Data Speak for Themselves
64
7 Estimating the Fiscal Effects of Political Regimes
82
8 The Institutional Balance of Modern Fiscal States
108
Appendices
121
Works Cited
209
Index
223
Other Books in the Series
235
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Mark Dincecco is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Michigan. His research and teaching interests include political economy, economic and political history, comparative politics, and public finance. He holds a PhD in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles, and has published in several academic journals.

Bibliographic information