The works of Jonathan Swift, containing additional letters, tracts, and poems, with notes, and a life of the author, by W. Scott (Google eBook)

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1814
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Page 471 - In happy climes, where from the genial sun And virgin earth such scenes ensue, The force of Art by Nature seems outdone, And fancied beauties by the true...
Page 483 - And the people said unto Saul, Shall Jonathan die, who hath wrought this great salvation in Israel ? God forbid : as the LORD liveth, there shall not one hair of his head fall to the ground ; for he hath wrought with God this day. So the people rescued Jonathan, that he died not.
Page 204 - The Earl of Oxford was removed on Tuesday, " the Queen died on Sunday! What a world is " this, and how does Fortune banter us !" says Bolingbroke.* * Letter to Swift, Aug.
Page 20 - Dear Mat, hide the nakedness of thy country, and give the best turn thy fertile brain will furnish thee with to the blunders of thy countrymen, who are not much better politicians than the French are poets.'* Soon after, the duke of Shrewsbury went on a formal embassy to Paris.
Page 100 - he shall not begin to print till I have a thousand guineas for him.' Lord Treasurer, after leaving the Queen, came through the room, beckoning Dr. Swift to follow him, both went off just before prayers.
Page 100 - if the courtiers give me a watch that won't go right?' Then he instructed a young nobleman that the best poet in England was Mr. Pope (a Papist), who had begun a translation of Homer into English verse, for which, he said, he must have them all subscribe. 'For,' says he, 'the author shall not begin to print till I have a thousand guineas for him.
Page 191 - I may prevail to renew your licence of absence, conditionally you will be present with me ; for to-morrow morning I shall be a private person. When I have settled my domestic affairs here, I go to Wimple ; thence, alone, to Herefordshire. If I have not tired you tete a tete, fling away so much time upon one, who loves you.
Page 142 - I desire him not to alter any of his methods for me, so we dine exactly between twelve and one. At eight we have some bread and butter and a glass of ale, and at ten he goes to bed. Wine is a stranger, except a little I sent him ; of which, one evening in two, we have a pint between us. His wife has been this month twenty miles off, at her father's, and will not return these ten days. I never saw her ; and perhaps the house will be worse when she comes. I read all day, or walk, and do not speak as...
Page 398 - I am this morning in the humoiir of scribbling, to make my letter at least as long as one of your sermons ; and, if you do not mend, my next shall be as long as one of Dr Manton's,* who taught my youth to yawn, and pre'pared me to "be a high churchman, that I might never hear him read, nor read him more.
Page 193 - I could tell you the queen had got so far the better of the dragon, as to take her power out of his hands. He has been the most ungrateful man to her, and to all his best friends, that ever was born. I cannot have so much time now to write all my mind, because my dear mistress is...

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