Weather Lore: A Collection of Proverbs, Sayings, and Rules Concerning the Weather (Google eBook)

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E. Stock, 1898 - Weather - 233 pages
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Page 61 - He answered and said unto them, "When it is evening ye say, 'It will be fair weather; for the sky is red.
Page 105 - That which is now a horse, even with a thought The rack dislimns, and makes it indistinct, As water is in water.
Page 105 - And it came to pass at the seventh time, that he said, Behold, there ariseth a little cloud out of the sea like a man's hand.
Page 203 - The moon in halos hid her head ; The boding shepherd heaves a sigh, For see ! a rainbow spans the sky. The walls are damp, the ditches smell, Closed is the pink-eyed pimpernel.
Page 105 - Sometime, we see a cloud that's dragonish, A vapour, sometime, like a bear, or lion, A tower'd citadel, a pendant rock, A forked mountain, or blue promontory With trees upon't, that nod unto the world, And mock our eyes with air: thou hast seen these signs; They are black vesper's pageants.
Page 135 - A rainbow in the morning is the shepherd's warning ; A rainbow at night is the shepherd's delight.
Page 104 - He causeth the vapours to ascend from the ends of the earth ; he maketh lightnings for the rain ; he bringeth the wind out of his treasuries.
Page 144 - Each cast at the other, as when two black clouds With heaven's artillery fraught, come rattling on Over the Caspian, then stand front to front Hovering a space, till winds the signal blow To join their dark encounter in mid air...
Page 73 - Late late yestreen I saw the new moone, Wi the auld moone in hir arme, And I feir, I feir, my deir master, That we will cum to harme.' O our Scots nobles wer richt laith To weet their cork-heild schoone ; Bot lang owre a' the play wer playd, Thair hats they swam aboone.
Page 203 - The distant hills are seeming nigh. How restless are the snorting swine ; The busy flies disturb the kine ; Low o'er the grass the swallow wings, The cricket too, how sharp he sings ; Puss on the hearth, with velvet paws, Sits wiping o'er her whiskered jaws.

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