The Best Military Science Fiction of the 20th Century (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Harry Turtledove, Martin H. Greenberg
Random House Publishing Group, Jul 25, 2006 - Fiction - 544 pages
12 Reviews
Explosive and provocative battles fought across the boundaries of time and space--and on the frontiers of the human mind.

Science fiction's finest have yielded this definitive collection featuring stories of warfare, victory, conquest, heroism, and overwhelming odds. These are scenarios few have ever dared to contemplate, and they include:

¸  "Superiority": Arthur C. Clarke presents an intergalactic war in which one side's own advanced weaponry may actually lead to its ultimate defeat.
¸  "Dragonrider": A tale of Anne McCaffrey's Dragonriders of Pern, in which magic tips the scales of survival.
¸  "Second Variety": Philip K. Dick, author of the short story that became the movie Blade Runner, reaches new heights of terror with his post apocalyptic vision of the future.
¸  "The Night of the Vampyres": A chilling ultimatum of atomic proportions begins a countdown to disaster in George R. R. Martin's gripping drama.
¸  "Hero": Joe Haldeman's short story that led to his classic of interstellar combat, The Forever War.
¸  "Ender's Game": The short story that gave birth to Orson Scott Card's masterpiece of military science fiction.
. . . as well as stories from Poul Anderson o Gregory Benford o C. J. Cherryh o David Drake o Cordwainer Smith o Harry Turtledove o and Walter John Williams

Guaranteed to spark the imagination and thrill the soul, these thirteen science fiction gems cast a stark light on our dreams and our darkest fears--truly among the finest tales of the 20th century.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
  

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Review: The Best Military Science Fiction of the 20th Century

User Review  - Matt Nichols - Goodreads

This is my first adventure into modern science fiction and it was a good collection to start with. I definitely got a good variety of storytelling from a myriad of writers. I recommend it. Read full review

Review: The Best Military Science Fiction of the 20th Century

User Review  - James - Goodreads

A collection of work from quite a variety of authors with a real range of visions and philosophies - for anyone interested in this sub-genre, a great book. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
2
Section 3
26
Section 4
71
Section 5
72
Section 6
74
Section 7
77
Section 8
86
Section 20
178
Section 21
179
Section 22
230
Section 23
231
Section 24
262
Section 25
263
Section 26
278
Section 27
306

Section 9
89
Section 10
93
Section 11
101
Section 12
108
Section 13
112
Section 14
115
Section 15
120
Section 16
128
Section 17
129
Section 18
139
Section 19
140
Section 28
307
Section 29
349
Section 30
357
Section 31
358
Section 32
388
Section 33
389
Section 34
421
Section 35
435
Section 36
436
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Harry Norman Turtledove, 1949 - Harry Turtledove was born in Los Angeles, CA on June 14, 1949. He attended Caltech, failing out his first year, and UCLA where, in 1977, he received a Ph.D in Bysantine History. From the late 1970's to the early 1980's, Turtledove worked as a technical writer for the Los Angeles County Office of Education, which he left in 1991 to begin writing full time. From 1986-1987, he was the Treasurer for the Science Fiction Writers of America. Turtledove published his first two novels, "Wereblood" and Werenight," in 1979. He published them under the pseudonym Eric G. Iverson because his editor did not think people would believe that Turtledove was his real name. He used this name until 1985 when he published "Herbig-Haro." His awards include the Homer Award for Short Story, 1990, for "Designated Hitter," and the Hugo Award for Novella, 1994, for "Down in the Bottomlands." Also, "Must and Shall" was nominated for the 1996 Hugo Award for Best Novelette, the 1996 Nebula Award for Best Novelette and received an honorable mention for the 1995 Sidewise Award for Alternate History. "The Two Georges" received an honorable mention for the 1995 Sidewise Award for Alternate History.

Martin H. Greenberg, 1941 - Martin H. Greenberg was born in 1941. He is a professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin. Over the course of his long and prolific career, Greenberg has edited three collections, one with Isaac Asimov, 14 anthology series and over 200 anthologies. In 1994, Greenberg won the Horror Guild Award. He went on to win the Deathrealm Award in 1996 and the Bram Stoker Award in 1998.

Bibliographic information