Bioregionalism

Front Cover
Michael Vincent McGinnis
Psychology Press, 1999 - Nature - 231 pages
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Bioregionalism has emerged as the framework to study the complex relationships between human communities, government institutions and the natural world, and through which to plan and implement environmental policy. Bioregionalists believe that as members of distinct communities, human beings cannot avoid interacting with and being affected by their specific location, place and bioregion: despite modern technology, we are not insulated from nature. This text explains the theoretical and practical dimensions of bioregionalism from an interdisciplinary standpoint, focusing on the place of bioregional identity within global politics. Contributors from a broad range of disciplines introduce bioregionalism as a framework for thinking about indigenous peoples, local knowledge, globalization, science, global environmental issues, modern society, conservation, history, education and restoration. Bioregionalisms emphasis on place and community radically changes the way we confront human and ecological issues.
  

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Contents

PART II
5
A story from many voices
13
Thinking about bioregional history
43
Boundary creatures and bounded spaces
61
Bioregional possibilities in Vermont
81
Bioregionalism civil society and global environmental governance
101
Toward a cosmopolitan bioregionalism
121
PART III
139
Pragmatic
157
The role of education and ideology in the transition from
191
Reestablishing an ecology of shared
205
Index
223
Copyright

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References to this book

Ecocriticism
Greg Garrard
No preview available - 2004
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About the author (1999)

Michael McGinnis is Director and Postdoctoral Researcher at the Ocean and Coastal Policy Center, University of California, Santa Barbara.

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