A Companion for a Leisure Hour (Google eBook)

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J. Almon, 1769 - English literature - 164 pages
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Page 97 - Turn, gentle hermit of the dale, And guide my lonely way To where yon taper cheers the vale With hospitable ray. " For here forlorn and lost I tread, With fainting steps and slow ; Where wilds immeasurably spread, Seem lengthening as I go.'" " Forbear, my son," the hermit cries, " To tempt the dangerous gloom ; For yonder faithless phantom flies To lure thee to thy doom.
Page 98 - I condemn ; Taught by that power that pities me, I learn to pity them. But from the mountain's grassy side A guiltless feast I bring ; A scrip with herbs and fruits supplied, And water from the spring. Then, pilgrim, turn, thy cares forego, All earth-born cares are wrong ; Man wants but little here below, Nor wants that little long.
Page 103 - Turn, Angelina, ever- dear. My charmer, turn to see Thy own, thy long-lost Edwin here, Restored to love and thee. "Thus let me hold thee to my heart; And every care resign : And shall we never, never part, My life my all that's mine ? " No, never from this hour to part, We'll live and love so true, The sigh that rends thy constant heart Shall break thy Edwin's too.
Page 98 - No flocks that range the valley free, To slaughter I condemn: Taught by that Power that pities me, I learn to pity them : "But from the mountain's grassy side A guiltless feast I bring; A scrip with herbs and fruits supplied, And water from the spring. "Then, pilgrim, turn, thy cares forego ; All earth-born cares are wrong; Man wants but little here below, Nor wants that little long.
Page 99 - To soothe the stranger's woe; For grief was heavy at his heart, And tears began to flow. His rising cares the Hermit spied, With answering care opprest : " And whence, unhappy youth," he cried, " The sorrows of thy breast ? " From better habitations spurn'd, Reluctant dost thou rove?
Page 101 - But let a maid thy pity share, Whom love has taught to stray : Who seeks for rest, but finds despair Companion of her way. " My father liv'd beside the Tyne, A wealthy lord was he : And all his wealth was mark'd as mine, He had but only me. " To win me from his tender arms, Unnumber'd suitors came ; Who prais'd me for imputed charms, And felt or feign'da flame.
Page 107 - tis call'd, rifes up to the brim : The fourth part of a pint you next muft allow Of new milk made as warm as it comes from the cow. Put the rinds of the lemons, the milk, and the fyrup, With the rum, in a jar, and give 'em a...
Page 124 - And, by th' approaching summer season, Draws a few hundreds from the stocks, And purchases his country box. Some three or four miles out of town, (An hour's ride will bring you down,) He fixes on his choice abode, Not half a furlong from the road : And so convenient does it lay, The...
Page 136 - Say from what caufe it firfl deriv'd its birth, How form'd in heav'n, how thence deduc'd to earth. Once in Arcadia, that fam'd feat of love, There liv'da nymph, the pride of all the grove, A lovely nymph, adorn'd with ev'ry grace, An eafy fhape, and...
Page 125 - Hugging themselves in ease and clover. With all the fuss of moving over : Lo ! a new heap of whims are bred. And wanton in my lady's head. ' Well ! to be sure, it must be own'd.

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