Carmen Saeculare

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 23, 2011 - History - 297 pages
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The Carmen Saeculare was composed and published in 17 BCE as Horace was returning to the genre of lyric which he had abandoned six years earlier; the fourth book of Odes is in part a response to this poem, the only commissioned poem we know from the period. The hardening of the political situation, with the Republic a thing of the past and the Augustan succession in the air, threw the problematic issue of praise into fresh relief, and at the same time provided an impulse towards the nostalgia represented by the poet's private world. Professor Thomas provides an introduction and commentary (the first full commentary in English since the nineteenth century) to each of the poems, exploring their status as separate lyric artefacts and their place in the larger web of the book. The edition is intended primarily for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students, but is also important for scholars.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Text and Sigla
24
Q Horati Flacci Carmen saecvlare
27
Q HORATI FLACCI CARMINVM LIBER QVARTVS
33
COMMENTARY ON CARMEN SAECVLARE
53
COMMENTARY ON Odes IV
85
Appendix 1 The Secular Games
271
Appendix 2 Acta of the Augustan Secular Games of 17 BCE lines 90168
274
Appendix 3 The Sibylline Oracle for the Secular Games of 17 BCE
277
Bibliography
279
Indexes
289
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Horace is one of the most noted poets and satirists of Ancient times. Born Quintus Horatius Flaccus, to a former slave in 65 B.C., Horace was taken to Rome and Athens to be educated. He joined Brutus's army after the assassination of Julius Caesar, and later came under favor of the emperor Octavian. Horace used his observations of politics to great advantage in his works. Horace is chiefly remembered for his four books of Odes. Technically and lyrically stunning, they contain word organization and imagery that is employed masterfully. He is also noted for the brilliant satires that brought him to the attention of the poet Virgil. Virgil introduce him to Maecenas, a wealthy patron, who would help Horace throughout his life. Horace earned a great reputation during his lifetime and was an example to many later generations of poets. Horace died in 8 B.C., a few months after his friend and patron Maecenas.

Richard F. Thomas is Professor of Greek and Latin and Harvard College Professor at Harvard University. His teaching and research interests are generally focused on Hellenistic Greek and Roman literature, particularly that of Augustan Rome, intertextuality, translation and translation theory, the reception of classical literature in all periods, and the works of Bob Dylan. Recent books include Reading Virgil and his Texts: Studies in Intertextuality (1999) and Virgil and the Augustan Reception (2001), and two co-edited volumes, Classics and the Uses of Reception (with Charles Martindale, 2006) and Bob Dylan's Performance Artistry (with Catharine Mason, 2007).