Republican China, 1912-1949

Front Cover
John King Fairbank, Denis Crispin Twitchett, Albert Feuerwerker
Cambridge University Press, 1986 - China - 1092 pages
1 Review
This is the second of two volumes of this authoritative history which review the Republican period. The titanic drama of the Chinese Revolution is one of the major world events of modern times. The fifteen authors of this volume are pioneers in its exploration and analysis, and their text is designed to meet the needs of non-specialist readers. After a preliminary overview stressing economic and social history, the History presents a narrative of events in China's foreign relations to 1931, and in the political history of the Nationalist government and its Communist opponents from 1927 to 1937. Subsequent chapters analyse key governmental, educational and literary - offering critical appraisal of the major achievements and problems in each of these areas. Finally, the volume examines China's war of resistance, the civil war to 1949, and the portentous development of the thought of Mao Tse-tung before coming to power.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

perspectives on modern Chinas history
1
Provinces of China under the Repuhlic
5
Railways in 1949
23
Chinas international relations 19111931
74
Manchuria theThree Eastern Provinces
83
World War
100
Nationalist China during the Nanking decade 19271937
116
dominance
130
Nationalist China during the SinoJapanese War 19371945
547
Japanese military occupation of China proper
549
The Chinese Communist movement during
609
Japanese occupation of North China to c mid1940s
628
hasic data
633
Eighth Route Army deployment JulyDecemher 1937
637
Communist hases as claimed overall late 1944
645
Military situation North China Octoher 1938
647

The Communist movement 19271937
168
Chinese Communist areas early 1930s
184
The Long March to Shensi
210
The agrarian system
230
Peasant movements
270
characteristics
288
The HaiLufeng region
308
The development of local government
329
War and postwar changes 19371949
412
the road to revolution 19271949
421
literature
428
Japanese aggression and Chinas international position
492
China and Japan in the Second World War 19411945
530
Chinas postwar eclipse 19451949
540
The middle years 19391943
658
Disposition of New Fourth Army after the New Fourth Army incident
667
The last years of the war 19441945
705
The KMTCCP conflict 19451949
723
Zones under suhstantial Communist control in August 1945 72 5
760
The CCP offensive spring and summer 1948
771
The hatrle of HuaiHai Novemher 1948 January 1949
779
Mao Tsetungs thought to 1949
789
autocracy?
866
Bihliography
908
pinyin to WadeGiles
1012
o 15
1041
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1986)

Born in South Dakota, John King Fairbank attended local public schools for his early education. From there he went on first to Exeter, then the University of Wisconsin, and ultimately to Harvard, from which he received his B.A. degree summa cum laude in 1929. That year he traveled to Britain as a Rhodes Scholar. In 1932 he went to China as a teacher and after extensive travel there received his Ph.D. from Oxford University in 1936. Between 1941 and 1946, he was in government service---as a member of the Office of Strategic Services, as special assistant to the U.S. ambassador to China, and finally as director of the U.S. Information Service in China. Excepting those years, beginning in 1936, Fairbank spent his entire career at Harvard University, where he served in many positions, including Francis Lee Higginson Professor of History and director of Harvard's East Asian Research Center. Fairbank, who came to be considered one of the world's foremost authorities on modern Chinese history and Asian-West relations, was committed to reestablishing diplomatic and cultural relations with China. He was also committed to the idea that Americans had to become more conversant with Asian cultures and languages. In his leadership positions at Harvard and as president of the Association for Asian Studies and the American Historical Association, he sought to broaden the bases of expertise about Asia. At the same time, he wrote fluidly and accessibly, concentrating his work on the nineteenth century and emphasizing the relationship between China and the West. At the same time, his writings placed twentieth-century China within the context of a changed and changing global order. It was precisely this understanding that led him to emphasize the reestablishment of American links with China. More than anyone else, Fairbank helped create the modern fields of Chinese and Asian studies in America. His influence on American understanding of China and Asia has been profound.

Bibliographic information