Every Horse Owners' Cyclopedia ...: Diseases, and how to Cure Them ... (Google eBook)

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Porter & Coates, 1871 - Horses - 570 pages
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Page 530 - ... to prevent a competitor from getting before them. The horses on their part are not without emulation. They tremble, and are impatient, and continually in motion. At last, the signal once given, they...
Page 15 - It is also very necessary to observe whether the mouth be fine or hard on both sides, or on one or the other. For horses which have not both jaws equally sensitive, are likely to be hard-mouthed on one side or the other. And it is better that a horse should have prominent than hollow eyes, for such a one will see to a greater distance. And widely-opened nostrils are far better for respiration than narrow, and they give the horse a fiercer aspect ; for when one stallion is enraged against another,...
Page 532 - Jamaica turnpike in 2 m. 40 s., which shows a considerable advance in speed in the six years which had intervened. The performances of Top Gallant were so extraordinary, and he was in every respect such a superior horse, that a more complete record of him has been handed down than of any of the old-time trotters. He was foaled in 1808, but trotted his principal races after he was twenty years old. Hiram Woodruff, who rode him at his exercise, thus describes him : " Top Gallant was a dark bay, fifteen...
Page 42 - At night ho is tied in the court-yard. The horses' heads are attached to the place of security by double ropes from their halters, and the heels of their hinder legs are confined by cords of twisted hair, fastened to iron rings and pegs driven into the earth. The same custom prevailed in the time of Xenophon, and for the same reason, to secure them from being able to attack and maim, each other, the whole stud generally consisting of stallions. Their keepers, however, always sleep in their rugs amongst...
Page 129 - That he is so constituted by nature that he will not offer resistance to any demand made of him which he fully comprehends, if made in a way consistent with the laws of his nature.
Page 141 - Rarey brought with him across the Atlantic. The clever management of his partner, Mr. Goodenough, and the profound secrecy maintained for so long, carried the public away far beyond this, and, as in the fable of the fox who had lost his tail, all those who had spent their ten guineas were anxious to place their friends in the same predicament This is the only way in which I can account for the extraordinary conclusions to which so many practised horsemen arrived in 1858. Since that time, it is true...
Page 49 - ... limbs were entirely free from it. His feet were small, but well shaped, and he was in every respect perfectly sound and free from blemish.
Page 179 - ... circumstances. All these substances are found in the blood, but the composition of this fluid does not enlighten us as to the wants of the system, because it is continually receiving and giving off its various elements. The blood of a horse fed on highly nitrogenized food, does not differ on analysis from that of another which has been kept on the opposite kind of diet Physiological research, however, tells us that muscle is chiefly composed of...
Page 101 - THE INFLUENCE OF THE MALE upon the embryo is partly dependent upon the fact, that he furnishes a portion of its substance in the shape of the sperm-coll, but also in great measure upon the effect exerted upon the nervous system of the mother by him. Hence, the preponderance of one or other of the parents will, in great measure, depend upon the greater or less strength of nervous system in each. No general law is known by which this can be measured, nor is anything known of the laws which regulate...
Page 533 - The improvement of the trotting horse is engaging the attention of some of the best sporting characters in the country. We believe our State boasts of the best trotters in the Union. New York is nearly as good as our own. It is, in our opinion, a sport which should be encouraged.

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