A Historical Sketch of Sturbridge and Southbridge (Google eBook)

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Press of O.S. Cooke and Company, 1856 - Southbridge (Mass.) - 233 pages
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Page 119 - England lying between three miles to the northward of Merrimack River, and three miles to the southward of Charles River, and in length within the described breadth from the Atlantic Ocean to the South Sea.
Page 96 - ... the wants and duties of a free people. The condition of the common schools was depressed ; the number of public institutions for education was few ; and the idea of establishing such an institution in this county occupied his thoughts for some time before any measures were taken to accomplish it. He, at first, conceived the plan of founding an academy in the pleasant village where he resided. But the opportunity that presented, as has...
Page 95 - September 8, 1740, and was graduated at Yale College, 1759. Soon after this he engaged in mercantile business in his native town. At the age of twenty-two he married Mehitable Chandler, and, soon after, removed to Sturbridge, where he continued to pursue the same business in which he had been engaged, and, by attention and assiduity, acquired thereby a large estate. At the commencement of hostilities, he held the command of a company of cavalry, which he had raised and organized, and joined the army...
Page 96 - ... suppressing that alarming but ill-judged outbreak. With the enlarged and patriotic views of Col. Crafts, the importance of educating the rising generation early attracted his attention. The people were about to assume the solemn trust of self-government, and to do this they should be able to understand the wants and duties of a free people. The condition of the Common Schools was depressed ; the number of public institutions for education was few ; and the idea of establishing such an institution...
Page 96 - This took place in the winter of 1790-1, and the town, out of respect to its founder, took the name of Craftsbury. In 1792 he resigned his place as a trustee of the Academy, up to which time he cherished and promoted its interests, and shared in its early struggles against the same difficulties which were embarrassing his own affairs. Here (at Craftsbury) he gathered around him a number of excellent families from Sturbridge and neighboring towns, and a little community was formed, of which he was...
Page 97 - ... shared in its early struggles against the same difficulties which were embarrassing his own affairs. Here (at Craftsbury) he gathered around him a number of excellent families from Sturbridge and neighboring towns, and a little community was formed, of which he was the acknowledged head. The Academy is in possession of an excellent likeness of this founder of the institution. He was a man of great energy and firmness, and, though liberal in his views and sentiments, he was inflexible in the maintenance...
Page 97 - For twenty years, he stood to it in the relation of a patriarch, a friend and counsellor, whose intelligence all understood, and whose friendship and fidelity all esteemed. His generous hospitality, his energy of character, his calm dignity, and his pure and Christian life, acting, as they did, upon a well-educated, sympathizing community, exerted an influence, and stamped a character upon the people and fortunes of the town he planted, which is plainly perceptible to this day.
Page 95 - Rebellion," he marched with a body of one hundred men, under Gen. Lincoln, in the winter of 1786-7, into the western counties, where he rendered prompt and essential service in suppressing that alarming but ill-judged outbreak. With the enlarged and patriotic views of Col. Crafts, the importance of educating the rising generation early attracted his attention. The people were about to assume the solemn trust of self-government, and to do this they should be able to understand the wants and duties...
Page 96 - But the opportunity that presented, as has already been stated, for procuring a suitable building in Leicester, and the cooperation of Col. Davis (of Charlton) in the scheme, induced him to direct his efforts to its establishment in that place, with the zeal and success which I have already had occasion to notice. By his efforts in this and other benevolent enterprises, and that general revulsion of business which, after the close of the war, proved so disastrous to New England, he became so much...
Page 195 - Direct charity," he would say, " places its recipient under a sense of obligation which trenches upon that independent spirit that all should maintain. It breaks his pride, and he soon learns to beg and eat the bread of idleness without a blush. But employ and pay him, and he receives and enjoys with honest pride that which he knows he has earned, and could have received for the same amount of labor from any other employer.

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