The Varieties of Religious Experience: A Study in Human Nature; Being the Gifford Lectures on Natural Religion Delivered at Edinburgh in 1901-1902 (Google eBook)

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1902 - Religion - 534 pages
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Review: The Varieties of Religious Experience (Bedford Series in History & Culture)

User Review  - Douglas - Goodreads

Rarely do I read a book a second time, but this is now the third time I've read this one, and it's still fresh and relevant. Read full review

Review: The Varieties of Religious Experience (Bedford Series in History & Culture)

User Review  - Jeff Wheeler - Goodreads

This was definitely not a pleasure read - it's a series of lectures from an psychologist back in the early 1900's that he gave in Scotland. I got it for free on Kindle and spent many months going ... Read full review

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Page 139 - For the living know that they shall die : but the dead know not any thing, neither have they any more a reward ; for the memory of them is forgotten. Also their love, and their hatred, and their envy, is now perished; neither have they any more a portion for ever in any thing that is done under the sun.
Page 76 - Canst thou by searching find out God? canst thou find out the Almighty unto perfection? It is as high as heaven; what canst thou do? deeper than hell; what canst thou know? The measure thereof is longer than the earth, and broader than the sea.
Page 396 - Swiftly arose and spread around me the peace and knowledge that pass all the argument of the earth, And I know that the hand of God is the promise of my own, And I know that the spirit of God is the brother of my own, And that all the men ever born are also my brothers, and the women my sisters and lovers, And that a kelson of the creation is love...
Page 188 - Such a nation might truly say to corruption, thou art my father, and to the worm, thou art my mother and my sister.
Page 31 - Religion, therefore, as I now ask you arbitrarily to take it, shall mean for us the feelings, acts, and experiences of individual men in their solitude, so far as they apprehend themselves to stand in relation to whatever they may consider the divine.
Page 281 - Feeling that, having once fallen, he might as well be hanged for a sheep as for a lamb...
Page 139 - Truly the light is sweet, and a pleasant thing it is for the eyes to behold the sun : but if a man live many years, and rejoice in them all ; yet let him remember the days of darkness ; for they shall be many.
Page 171 - For that which I do I allow not: for what I would, that do I not; but what I hate, that do I.
Page 161 - After this the universe was changed for me altogether. I awoke morning after morning with a horrible dread at the pit of my stomach, and with a sense of the insecurity of life that I never knew before, and that I have never felt since. It was like a revelation; and although the immediate feelings passed away, the experience has made me sympathetic with the morbid feelings of others ever since. It gradually faded, but for months I was unable to go out into the dark alone.
Page 139 - Then I looked on all the works that my hands had wrought, and on the labour that I had laboured to do : and, behold, all was vanity and vexation of spirit, and th-ere was no profit under the sun, What profit hath a man of all his labour which he taketh under the sun?

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