The History of England: From the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution in 1688, Volume 6 (Google eBook)

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1776
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Review: The History of England, 6 Vols

User Review  - Brendan - Goodreads

Vol. 5 (...now I HAVE to read the 5 other volumes) A complex, exhausting compendium of conjectural history, philosophy, and humanist sensibilities. This is a triumphant feat. To read the life and ... Read full review

Review: The History of England, 6 Vols

User Review  - Richard Epstein - Goodreads

The best history of England ever written by a great philosopher. Go ahead, read it. You'll be a better person for it. And even if you're not, think how saying you read it will impress your next date from christianmingle.com. Read full review

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Page 468 - ... is used in armies in time of war, to proceed to the trial and condemnation of such offenders, and them to cause to be executed and put to death according to the law martial : VIII.
Page 469 - Majesty, that no man hereafter be compelled to make or yield any gift, loan, benevolence, tax, or such like charge, without common consent by act of parliament...
Page 468 - ... by your Majesty's writs of habeas corpus, there to undergo and receive as the court should order, and their keepers commanded to certify the causes of their detainer, no cause was certified, but that they were detained by your Majesty's special command, signified by the lords of your Privy Council, and yet were returned back to several prisons, without being charged with anything to which they might make answer according to the law.
Page 228 - That he had a command from the king to adjourn, and to put no question;"* upon which he rose and left the chair. The whole house was in an uproar. The speaker was pushed back into the chair, and forcibly held in it by Hollis and Valentine, till a short remonstrance was framed, and was passed by acclamation rather than by vote.
Page 461 - That the liberties, franchises, privileges, and jurisdictions of Parliament are the ancient and undoubted birthright and inheritance of the subjects of England; and that the arduous and urgent affairs concerning the King, State, and defence of the realm and of the Church of England, and the maintenance and making of laws, and redress of mischiefs and grievances which daily happen within this realm, are proper subjects and matter of counsel and debate in Parliament...
Page 385 - But I assure you, on the word of a king, I never did intend any force, but shall proceed against them in a legal and fair way, for I never meant any other.
Page 384 - That they have traitorously endeavoured to subvert the rights and very being of Parliaments. 6. That for the completing of their traitorous designs, they have endeavoured (as far as in them lay), by force and terror to compel the Parliament to join with them in their traitorous designs, and to that end have actually raised and countenanced tumults against the King and Parliament.
Page 27 - Piercy; thirty-six barrels of powder lodged' in it; the whole covered up with faggots and billets; the doors of the cellar boldly flung open; and every body admitted, as if it contained nothing dangerous.
Page 131 - Of a feeble temper more than of a frugal judgment ; exposed to our ridicule from his vanity, but exempt from our hatred by his freedom from pride and arrogance. And, upon the whole, it may be pronounced of his character, that all his qualities were sullied with weakness, and embellished by humanity.
Page 210 - The King willeth that right be done according to the laws and customs of the realm ; and that the statutes be put in due execution, that his subjects may have no cause to complain of any wrong or oppressions, contrary to their just rights and liberties, to the preservation whereof he holds himself as well obliged as of his prerogative.

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