The Constitution of the United States: With Notes of the Decisions of the Supreme Court Thereon, from the Organization of the Court Till October, 1900 (Google eBook)

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Democrat printing Company, 1901 - Constitutional law - 418 pages
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Page 382 - States, or because of his having so exercised the same; or if two or more persons go in disguise on the highway, or on the premises of another, with intent to prevent or hinder his free exercise or enjoyment of any right or privilege so secured, they shall be fined not more than...
Page xli - States, with a request that it might "be submitted to a convention of delegates chosen in each state by the people thereof, under the recommendation of its legislature, for their assent and ratification.
Page 314 - The general government, and the States, although both exist within the same territorial limits, are separate and distinct sovereignties, acting separately and independently of each other, within their respective spheres. The former in its appropriate sphere is supreme; but the States within the limits of their powers not granted, or, in the language of the Tenth Amendment, "reserved," are as independent of the general government as that government within its sphere is independent of the States.
Page 280 - If any one proposition could command the universal assent of mankind, we might expect it would be this that the government of the Union, though limited in its powers, is supreme within its sphere of action.
Page 235 - States, and the decision is in favor of such their validity, or where any title, right, privilege, or immunity is claimed under the constitution or any treaty or statute of, or commission held or authority exercised under, the United States, and the decision is against the title, right, privilege, or exemption specially set up or claimed by either party, under such constitution, treaty, statute, commission, or authority...
Page xlii - No political dreamer was ever wild enough to think of breaking down the lines which separate the States, and of compounding the American people into one common mass.
Page 212 - A pardon is an act of grace, proceeding from the power intrusted with the execution of the laws, which exempts the individual, on whom it is bestowed, from the punishment the law inflicts for a crime he has committed.
Page 381 - If two or more persons conspire to injure, oppress, threaten, or intimidate any citizen in the free exercise or enjoyment of any right or privilege secured to him by the Constitution or laws of the United States...
Page 298 - The trial by jury is justly dear to the American people. It has always been an object of deep interest and solicitude, and every encroachment upon it has been watched with great jealousy.
Page 10 - States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of the State for which he shall be chosen.

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