The American Journal of Science and Arts (Google eBook)

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S. Converse, 1856
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Page 266 - That gravity should be innate, inherent and essential to matter, so that one body may act upon another at a distance through a vacuum, without the mediation of anything else, by and through which their action and force may be conveyed from one to another, is to me so great an absurdity, that I believe no man who has in philosophical matters a competent faculty of thinking, can ever fall into it.
Page 137 - Bryologia Britannica: Containing the Mosses of Great Britain and Ireland systematically arranged and described according to the Method of Bruch and Schimper ; with 61 illustrative Plates. Being a New Edition, enlarged and altered, of the Muscologia Britannica of Messrs.
Page 173 - ... may be regarded as the vertex of a cone whose surface includes all the positions of the optical axis of that eye as successively directed to the different points of the arc. This cone will of course be right or oblique, according to the direction in relation to the plane of the paper of the line joining the optical centre with the centre of the circle of which the arc is a part. The axis of the other eye, in ranging from end to end of the vertical line...
Page 267 - But if we conceive the sun existing alone in space, exerting no force of gravitation exterior to it; and then conceive another sphere in space having like conditions, and that the two are brought towards each other; if we assume, that by their mutual presence each causes the other to act, this is to assume not merely a creation of power, but a double creation, for both are supposed to rise from a previously inert to a powerful state. On their dissociation they, by the assumption, pass into the...
Page 267 - ... of the planets in different positions with respect to each other and the sun. Moreover, gravitation is not assumed to be a dual power, and in them only as yet have such removals been observed by experiment or conceived by the mind. The second sub-case, or that of a new or another form of power, is also one which has never been imagined by others, in association with the theory of gravity. I made some endeavours, experimentally, to connect gravity with electricity, having this very object in view...
Page 264 - When they were purposely placed inside on a card they were quite indifferent to the excited pole, except that those near the mouth of the chamber moved out and were attracted to the outer edges. A piece of soft iron at the end of a copper wire was strongly attracted by the outer parts of the pole, but unaffected within. When the chamber was filled with iron filings and inverted, the magnet being excited, all those from the bottom and interior of the chamber fell out, many, however, being caught up...
Page 375 - ... the force associated with each particle ? It is no doubt true, that if two charged particles can throw their power either on to one, or to three or more other particles, then all the difficulty disappears. Conduction proper can do this : but, as we cannot conceive of a particle half decomposed, so I cannot see how this can be performed by electrolytic conduction, ie how the particle between r and s can be excited to the intermediate and indefinite degree, conduction without electrolysis being...
Page 293 - ... test the matter in the fairest possible way, it was resolved to mark a portion of the smelts in such a manner that they might easily be detected when returning as grilse. A temporary tank, into which the fish must necessarily descend, was constructed at the junction of the sluice with the Tay; and as the shoals successively left the pond, about one in every hundred was marked by the abscission of the second dorsal fin. A greater number were marked on the 29th of May than on any other day, in...
Page 14 - Comparison of the diurnal inequality of the tides at San Diego, San Francisco, and Astoria, on the Pacific coast of the United States, from observations in connection with the Coast Snrvey.
Page 40 - ... by irregular differences. The effect of the rising or falling tide upon which these waves occur is of course greater in disturbing the heights than the times. The series itself looks like the result of several impulses, not of a single one, the heights rapidly increasing to the third wave, then diminishing as if the impulse had ceased, then being renewed, then ceasing, leaving the oscillation to extinguish itself. If we had a good scientific report of the facts as they occurred at Simoda, the...

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