The Bow and the Lyre: The Poem, The Poetic Revelation, Poetry and History

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University of Texas Press, Dec 1, 2009 - Literary Criticism - 294 pages
2 Reviews

In The Bow and the Lyre Octavio Paz, one of the most important poets writing in Spanish, presents his sustained reflections on the poetic phenomenon and on the place of poetry in history and in our personal lives. It is written in the same prose style that distinguishes The Labyrinth of Solitude. The Bow and the Lyre will serve as an important complement to Paz's poetry.

Paz's discussions of the different aspects of the poetic phenomenon are not limited to Spanish and Spanish American literature. He is almost as apt to choose an example from Homer, Vergil, Blake, Whitman, Rimbaud as he is from Lope de Vega, Jiménez, Darío, Neruda. In writing these essays, he draws on his vast storehouse of knowledge, revealing a world outlook of ample proportions. In reading these essays, we share the observations of a searching, original, highly cultivated mind.

  

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Review: The Bow and the Lyre: The Poem, the Poetic Revelation, Poetry and History

User Review  - Pax Analog - Goodreads

This book bursts out of the gate from the very first page with a high vocational sense of poetics as the true religion. It, in tandem with The Ever-Present Origin, helps implement a stance toward the creative process that is deeply enlightening. Read full review

Review: The Bow and the Lyre: The Poem, the Poetic Revelation, Poetry and History

User Review  - Jose - Goodreads

Learn Poetry. Read full review

Contents

Poetry and Poem
3
THE POEM
4
Language
19
Rhythm
38
Verse and Prose
56
The Image
84
THE POETIC REVELATION
99
The Other Shore
101
Inspiration
140
POETRY AND HISTORY
165
The Consecration of the Instant
167
The Heroic World
180
Ambiguity of the Novel
200
The Discarnate Word
213
Signs in Rotation
233
Copyright

The Poetic Revelation
121

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About the author (2009)

Octavio Paz (1914-1998) was born in Mexico City. He wrote many volumes of poetry, as well as a prolific body of remarkable works of non ction on subjects as varied as poetics, literary and art criticism, politics, culture, and Mexican history. He was awarded the Jerusalem Prize in 1977, the Cervantes Prize in 1981, and the Neustadt Prize in 1982. He received the German Peace Prize for his political work, and finally, the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1990.

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