Recollections of a Russian Diplomat: The Suicide of Monarchies (William II and Nicholas II) (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1918 - Europe - 327 pages
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Page 229 - His mental capacity was hardly mediocre. His entire success he owed to his zeal and to his very thorough knowledge of the contents of our diplomatic archives. He had been at college with Sazonoff, who later appointed him Assistant Minister, and since then he always had the sense to make himself indispensable to all foreign ministers, despite their widely divergent mentalities and ideas ... he was ever the same as on the first day he entered the service, always very eager to execute the orders of...
Page 230 - ... very thorough knowledge of the contents of our diplomatic archives. He had been at college with Sazonoff, who later appointed him Assistant Minister, and since then he always had the sense to make himself indispensable to all foreign ministers, despite their widely divergent mentalities and ideas ... he was ever the same as on the first day he entered the service, always very eager to execute the orders of his superiors, a hard worker, but painfully narrow minded, and wholly devoid of the attributes...
Page 332 - Pullmans, steerage passage to first cabin. In his mingling with the poorer classes he comes in contact intimately with a life which most writers know only by hearsay, and interesting bits of this life and that which is picturesque and romantic and unlocked for he transcribes to paper with a freshness and vividness that mark him a good mixer with men, a keen observer and a skillful adept with the pen.
Page 241 - Iswolsky sacrificed him and sent him to Serbia, possibly with the hope that in the very slippery and dangerous Balkan region, he might break his neck. But shortly after his arrival at Belgrade, Hartwig created a most exceptional position for himself. The King, Prince Alexander Paschitch, none of these made any decision without first consulting him. He had cleverly instilled in the minds of all the Serbian parties a love for Russia. I have seen him at his work, having been his guest for some time...
Page 309 - Princess and was present at the meeting between King Charles of Roumania and the Czar, at Constanza. Wherever she appeared, driving, riding or walking, beautiful as the day, gay, smiling and waving her handkerchief in response to the cheers of the people, the enthusiasm of the crowd for their princess was immense.
Page 241 - ... instilled in the minds of all the Serbian parties a love for Russia. I have seen him at his work, having been his guest for some time at Belgrade in 1912. Every morning his study was besieged by Serbian statesmen who came to get advice from him, but as usual the saying that a prophet is not without honor save in his own country held true, and Iswolsky and Sazonoff, possibly fearing a successor in Hartwig, took it upon themselves to paralyze his actions and nullify his work. When Hartwig warned...
Page 268 - In consequence extreme discontent arose throughout Russia. The Jews, Finns and Poles combined with the intellectuals against Stolypin. Opposition only seemed to make him more determined. He became more and more reactionary and unscrupulous in his use of authority to suppress any opposition, although in the Duma he still kept his ascendancy owing to his magnificent oratory and appearance.
Page 194 - They considered their interests in the Balkans small beside those of Russia and naturally preferred to follow the lead of Sazonoff. On the first of June, 1914, Emperor Nicholas had an interview with King Charles I of Roumania, at Constanza. I was there at the time, and learned through Roumanian statesmen, and intimate friends of mine, that King Charles had made certain promises to Russia. For example a military convention which had been in force between Austria-Hungary and Roumania for more than...
Page 171 - ... after, Minister-Resident to the Holy See. This was really the beginning of his fine career. His snobbishness at least equalled his ambitions. A great name was a divine endowment in his eyes. Of an unpleasing physical appearance he nevertheless thought himself irresistible where women were concerned. He also believed that after Bismarck he was the greatest diplomat in the world...
Page 144 - But, Osten-Sacken," snapped the Emperor, " "You forget that I have my Alliance." (Referring to his alliance with Austria-Hungary and Italy.) "Well, what about your Alliance," returned OstenSacken, smiling, "Do you really know, Sire, of what your Alliance consists? It is an alliance of a force with a weakness and an inconsequential thing.

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