Francisco Goya

Front Cover
Counterpoint, 2004 - Art - 246 pages
2 Reviews
Goya was breakfast companion of the Queen and painter to the court, but his portrait of the royal family is so mercilessly unflattering that it's been wondered how he escaped strangulation. Yet his female saints and angels were beautiful, buxom majas - many thought them more suitable for brothels than churches. Goya was the portraitist of noble after silly, vain noble, and lover to the Duchess of Alba, the most desired woman of his age and one of the wealthiest - but his Spain was also one of blind beggars, cripples, cut-throats, lunatics, swaggering majos, flirtatious majas, dwarfs, bullfights, carnivals, massacres, and Inquisitors seeking the Devil. Much of it Goya saw through a glass darkly.
This inscrutable artist is a brilliant choice of subject for Connell, whose literary histories and penetrating novels have placed him among our greatest writers. With his famous wit, wry erudition and prodigious research, he brings to life an artist of unsurpassed imagination and his brutal times - Spain in the clutches of the Inquisition. Connell introduces a wealth of detail and a cast of comic and eccentric characters - dukes, duchesses, royalty, politicians and artists; as lewd and incorrigible a group as history has ever produced. As he charts the arc of Goya's career, Connell keeps pace with the tumultuous era and shrewdly sifts through two centuries of commentary on Goya's work, from Paul Claudel's dismay that Goya sought to avoid the eyes and the image of God, to Baudelaire's deadly accurate comment that he painted the black magic of our civilization.
Goya's protean talent sent connoisseurs barking in various directions. He was a master whose image of Saturn bloodily devouring his son is as unforgettable as his peerless rendering of the gentle light caught in the white satin gown of a countess. Most critics agree that Goya changed Western art forever, although the nature of his influence has been widely interpreted. Edgar Degas, for one, lamented that because of Goya he was condemned to painting a housewife in her bathtub. Connell has marshaled the vast array of contradictory thoughts on Goya, and conjured the artist, his art, and his times with fierce originality and imagination. The result is an unforgettable portrait from a literary master.

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Francisco Goya

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Two masters of historical-literary prose have seized on the life and art of the Spanish painter Francisco Goya for their latest works. For Hughes, a life of Goya is the culmination of a writing ... Read full review

Review: Francisco Goya: A Life

User Review  - 'Aussie Rick' - Goodreads

This book by Evan Connell, author of "Son of the Morning Star", is not your typical biography of Goya the artist; rather it is a history of Goya's life and times. The book covers periods of Goya's ... Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Evan S. Connell was born August 17, 1924 in Kansas City, Missouri. He graduated from the University of Kansas in 1947. His first work, The Anatomy Lesson and Other Stories, was published in 1957. His first novel, Mrs. Bridge, was published in 1959. The sequel, Mr. Bridge, was published ten years later. In 1990, both novels were adapted into the film Mr. and Mrs. Bridge starring Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward. He wrote more than 15 books during his lifetime including Son of the Morning Star: Custer and the Little Bighorn, The Patriot, The Diary of a Rapist, The Connoisseur, Deus Lo Volt!, and Lost in Uttar Pradesh. He died on January 10, 2013 at the age of 88.

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