Sketches of Successful New Hampshire Men ... (Google eBook)

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J.B. Clarke, 1882 - New Hampshire - 315 pages
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Page 186 - ... justice, I have, therefore, thought it proper to appoint and I do hereby constitute a Provisional Court, which shall be a court of record for the State of Louisiana ; and I do hereby appoint Charles A.
Page 254 - My boast is not that I deduce my birth From loins enthroned and rulers of the earth, But higher far my proud pretensions rise : The son of parents passed into the skies.
Page 186 - EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, October 20, 1862. The insurrection which has for some time prevailed in several of the States of this Union, including Louisiana, having temporarily subverted and swept away the civil institutions of that State, including the judiciary and the judicial authorities of the Union, so that it has become necessary to hold the State in military occupation...
Page 240 - spoils," so-called, have never been his object in accepting offices of trust, at the hands of his constituents. He has found his reward more in the faithful and conscientious performance of his duty. In regard to the business career of Mr. Richards, we may say it has been characterized by great industry and enterprise, on a basis of good judgment, and in a spirit of fair dealing throughout. We have already alluded to his early inclination...
Page 26 - He has since obtained donations, amounting to upward of twelve thousand dollars, as a fund for paying the salary of the librarian. In 1859, he presided at the first public meeting called in Boston, in regard to the collocation of institutions on the Back Bay lands, where the splendid edifices of the Boston Society of Natural History and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology now stand. Of the latter institution he has been a vice-president, and the chairman of its Society of Arts, and a director...
Page 24 - At the age of four, Marshall was sent to school, and at twelve he entered New Ipswich Academy, his father desiring to give him a collegiate education, with reference to a profession. When he reached the age of sixteen, his father gave him the choice, either to qualify himself for a farmer, or for a merchant, or to fit for college. He chose to be a farmer; and to this choice may we attribute in no small degree the mental and physical energy which has distinguished so many years of his life. But the...
Page 98 - In 1802 he was appointed, by President Lincoln, collector of internal revenue for the second district of New Hampshire, including the counties of Merrimack and Hillsborough, and held the office for seven years, collecting and paying over to the treasurer of the United States nearly seven millions of dollars.
Page 27 - ... Williams College in a recent Memoir of Mr. Wilder remarks : " The interest which Colonel Wilder has always manifested in the progress of education, as well as the value and felicitous style of his numerous writings, would lead one to infer at once that his varied knowledge and culture are the results of college education. But he is only another illustrious example of the men who, with only small indebtedness to schools, have proved to the world that real men can make themselves known as such...
Page 26 - ... He was deputy grand master of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, and was one of the six thousand Masons who signed, December 31, 1831, the celebrated " Declaration of the Freemasons of Boston and Vicinity " ; and at the fiftieth anniversary of that event, which was celebrated in Boston two years ago, Mr. Wilder responded for the survivors, six of the signers being present. He has received all the Masonic degrees, including the 33d, or highest and last honor of the fraternity. At the World's Masonic...
Page 213 - ... her son a more complete education, sent him to the great Methodist school at Wilbraham, which at that time was a most flourishing preparatory school for the Wesleyan University at Middletown, Conn. Here he remained two terms, when, at nineteen years of age, returning to Lowell, he went into a woollen establishment as a dyer. Afterwards he went into this business on his own account, and continued in it until 1839. During the latter part of this time he was not so engrossed in his business but...

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