Uncertainty: Einstein, Heisenberg, Bohr, and the Struggle for the Soul of Science

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Anchor Books, 2008 - Science - 257 pages
33 Reviews
The remarkable story of a startling scientific idea that ignited a battle among the greatest minds of the twentieth century and profoundly influenced intellectual inquiry in fields ranging from physics to literary criticism, anthropology and journalism. In 1927, young German physicist Werner Heisenberg challenged centuries of scientific understanding when he introduced what came to be known as "the uncertainty principle." Heisenberg proved that in many physical measurements, you can obtain one bit of information only at the price of losing another. This proposition, undermining the cherished belief that science could reveal the physical world with limitless detail and precision, placed Heisenberg in direct opposition to the revered Albert Einstein. Niels Bohr, Heisenberg's mentor and Einstein's long-time friend, found himself caught between the two. Bohr understood that Heisenberg was correct, but he also recognized the vital necessity of gaining Einstein's support as the world faced the shocking implications of Heisenberg's principle.--From publisher description.

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Review: Uncertainty: Einstein, Heisenberg, Bohr, and the Struggle for the Soul of Science

User Review  - Tania - Goodreads

This book was interesting when it was detailing the history of quantum mechanics, but I found the 'what does it all mean' section at the end a bit dull. If you are familiar with the play 'Copenhagen' you will find some engaging references to events from the play in this book. Read full review

Review: Uncertainty: Einstein, Heisenberg, Bohr, and the Struggle for the Soul of Science

User Review  - Oliver Hodson - Goodreads

Really liked it. It was a very good explanation and contextualisation of the science and the personalities involved. Especially well handled was the internal conflict of the German scientists over metaphysics, quantum theory and ww2. Read full review

About the author (2008)

David Lindley holds a Ph.D. in astrophysics from Sussex University and has been an editor atNature,Science, andScience News. Now a full-time writer, he is the author ofThe End of Physics,Where Does the Weirdness Go?,The Science of Jurassic Park,Boltzmann's Atom, andDegrees Kelvin. He was also the recipient of the Phi Beta Kappa science writing prize. He lives in Alexandria, Virginia.

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