Intelligence and Espionage in the Reign of Charles II, 1660-1685

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 13, 2003 - History - 356 pages
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This is the first history and analysis of the intelligence and espionage activities of the regime of Charles II (1660-85). It is concerned with the mechanics, activities and philosophy of the intelligence system which developed under the auspices of the office of the Secretary of State and which emerged in the face of the problems of conspiracy and international politics. It examines the development of intelligence networks on a local and international level, the use made of the Post Office, codes and ciphers, and the employment of spies, informers and assassins. The careers of a number of spies employed by the regime are examined through a series of detailed case studes. The book provides a balanced portrait of the dark byways of Restoration politics, particularly in the 1660s and 1670s, and fills an important gap in the current literature.
  

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
28
Section 3
78
Section 4
96
Section 5
116
Section 6
142
Section 7
186
Section 8
244
Section 9
279
Section 10
301
Section 11
306
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About the author (2003)

A writer with an ear for the rhythms of Australian speech, Melbourne-based Alan Marshall published in the dominant social realist tradition of the 1940s and '50s. The author of short stories, journalism, children's books, novels and advice columns, he is best remembered for the first book of his autobiography, "I Can Jump Puddles" (1955). His work is marked by a deep interest in rural and working-class life, with an emphasis on shared experience.

Anthony Fletcher

Anthony Fletcher was Professor of History, University of Essex.

Diarmaid MacCulloch

Diarmaid MacCulloch is one of the leading historians of Tudor England and is Professor of Church History in the Theology Faculty at the University of Oxford. He has written widely in the past, including the books 'Thomas Cranmer: A Life' (Yale University Press) and 'Tudor Church Militant: Edward VI and the Protestant Reformation' (Penguin). He is currently writing a major survey of the European Reformation for Penguin.

Guy is a historian whose expertise is in Medieval and Tudor history and is a renowned authority on castles.

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