Lessons in Elocution: Or, A Selection of Pieces, in Prose and Verse, for the Improvement of Youth in Reading and Speaking. To which are Prefixed, Elements of Gesture. Illustrated by Four Plates; and Rules for Expressing with Propriety the Various Passions, &c. of the Mind. Also, an Appendix, Containing Lessons on a New Plan (Google eBook)

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Lincoln & Edmands, 1819 - Elocution - 360 pages
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Contents

On contentment Spectator
81
Needle work recommended to the ladies ibid
84
It On pride Guardian
86
Journal of the life of Alexander Severus Gibbon
88
Character of Julius Cassar Middleton ib 15 On mispent time Guardian
90
Character of Francis I Robertson
93
The supper and grace Stents
96
Rustic felicity ibid
98
House of mourning ibid ib SECTION HI 1 The honour and advantages of a constant adherence to truth Percivals Talctf
100
Impertintnce in discourse Theophrastus ib 3 Character of Addison as a writer Johnson
101
Page
102
Pleasure and pain Spectator
103
Sir Roger de Coverlys family ibid
104
The folly of inconsistent expectations AitkeiT
106
Description of the vale of Keswick in Cumberland Brovtn
108
Pityan allegory Aitten
111
Advantages of Commerce Spectator
112
On public speaking ibid
114
Advantages of history Hume
116
On the immortality of the soul Spectator
118
The combat of the Horatii and the A Curiatii Xivy
120
On the power of custom Spectator
122
On pedantry Mirror
124
The journey of a daya picture of human life Rambler
126
SECTION IV
129
Reflections in Westminster Abbey Spoctator
130
The character of Mary queen of Scots Robertson
133
The character of queen Elizabeth Hume
134
Charies Vs resignation of his dominions Robertson 156
139
T Address to art Harris
140
Flattery Theephraitus
142
The absent man Spectator
143
The Monk Sterne
144
On the head dress of ladies V Spectator
146
On the present and future state ibid
149
Uncle Tobys bevevolence Sterne
151
SECTION VI
186
Extract from the temple of fame Pope
201
On the order of nature Pope
207
Description of Mab queen of the Faries Shakespeare
213
Lamentation for theloss of sight Miltonf
224
LAllegro or the merry man ibid
225
On the pursuits of mankind Pope 227
227
Adam and Eves morning hymn MUton
229
Parting of Hector and Andromache Tomer
230
On the death of Christ Qlair
252
1 Speech of the Earl of Chesterfield
255
4
264
Cicero for Milo
267
SECTION IV
272
Hannibal to Scipio Africanus ibid 273
273
Scipios reply ibid
274
Caste Ihenes reproof of Cleons flattery to Alexander Curtit
275
Caius Marius to the Romans Hooie
276
Pubfius Scipio to the Roman army ibid
278
? Hannibal to the Carthagenian army ibid
281
Adherbat to the Roman senators Sallutt
283
Cammins to the Roman Consuls Hooie
286
Junius Brutus over the dead body of Lucretia Hooke
288
Demosthenes to the Athenians t Lansdown
289
Jupiter to the inferior deities Humer
294
iCneas to queen Dido Virgil
295
Moloch to the infernal powers Milton
296
Speech of Belial advisingpeace ibid
298
SECTION V
299
Lady Townly and lady Grace Provoked husband
301
Priuli and Jaffier Venice Preserved
305
Boniface and Airtlwell Beaux Stratagem
307
Lovegold and Lappet Miser
309
Cardinal Wolsey and Cromwell Henry VIII
313
Sir Charles and Lady Racket Three Weeks after Marriage
316
Brutus and Cassius Shakespeares Julius Cxsar
319
SPEECHES AND SOLILOQUIES 1 Hamlets advice to the players Tragedy of Hamlet
322
Douglass account of himself Tragedy of Douglass
323
the hermit ibid
324
Sempronius speech for war Tragedy of Cato ib 5 Lucius speech for peace Hid
325
Hotspurs accountof the fop 1 Henry the IV ib 7 soliloquy on the contents of a letter ibid
326
Othellos apology for his marriage Tragedy of Othello
327
Henry IVs soliloquy on sleep 2 Henry the IV
328
Soliloquy of Hamlets uncle on x
329
Soliloquy of Hamlet on death ibid
330
Falstafls encomiums on sack 2 Henry the IV
331
Prologue to the tragedy of Cato Pope ib 15 Catos soliloquy on the immortality of the soul Tragedy of Cato
332
Lady Randolphs soliloquy Tragedy of Douglass
333
before the Battle of Agincourt ibid
334
Soliloquy of Dick the apprentice Farce the apprentice
335
Cassias instigating Brutus to join the conspiracy against Caesar Tragedy of Julius Ctesar
336
Brutus harangue on the death f Caesar ibid
337
Antonys oration over Cesars body iW
338
FalsUns soliloquy on honour Hthry IV
340

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Popular passages

Page 184 - Whilst all the stars that round her burn, And all the planets in their turn, Confirm the tidings as they roll, And spread the truth from pole to pole. What though, in solemn silence, all Move round the dark terrestrial ball?
Page 332 - Help me, Cassius, or I sink.' I, as ./Eneas, our great ancestor, Did from the flames of Troy upon his shoulder The old Anchises bear ; so, from the waves of...
Page 185 - The sober herd that low'd to meet their young ; The noisy geese that gabbled o'er the pool, The playful children just let loose from school ; The watch-dog's voice that bay'd the whispering wind, And the loud laugh that spoke the vacant mind ; These all in sweet confusion sought the shade, And fill'd each pause the nightingale had made.
Page 325 - Pray can I not, Though inclination be as sharp as will, My stronger guilt defeats my strong intent, And, like a man to double business bound, I stand in pause where I shall first begin, And both neglect. What if this cursed hand Were thicker than itself with brother's blood, Is there not rain enough in the sweet heavens To wash it white as snow?
Page 311 - Love thyself last: cherish those hearts that hate thee; Corruption wins not more than honesty. Still in thy right hand carry gentle peace, To silence envious tongues. Be just, and fear not: Let all the ends thou aim'st at be thy country's, Thy God's, and truth's; then if thou fall'st, O Cromwell, Thou fall'st a blessed martyr.
Page 323 - Their dearest action in the tented field; And little of this great world can I speak, More than pertains to feats of broil and battle ; And therefore little shall I grace my cause In speaking for myself. Yet, by your gracious patience...
Page 229 - And we will then repair Unto the Bell at Edmonton, All in a chaise and pair. My sister, and my sister's child, Myself, and children three, Will fill the chaise ; so you must ride On horseback after we.
Page 333 - Romans, countrymen, and lovers ! hear me for my cause, and be silent, that you may hear : believe me for mine honour, and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe : censure me in your wisdom, and awake your senses, that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his.
Page 324 - Wilt thou upon the high and giddy mast Seal up the ship-boy's eyes, and rock his brains In cradle of the rude imperious surge ; And in the visitation of the winds, "Who take the ruffian billows by the top, Curling their monstrous heads, and hanging them With deaf'ning clamours in the slippery clouds, That, with the hurly * death itself awakes...
Page 332 - Why should that name be sounded more than yours? Write them together, yours is as fair a name; Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well; Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with 'em, Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar.

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