In the Castle of My Skin

Front Cover
University of Michigan Press, 1991 - Fiction - 303 pages
11 Reviews
George Lamming's "In the Castle of My Skin" skilfully depicts the Barbadian psyche. Set against the backdrop of the 1930s riots which helped to pave the way for Independence and the modern Barbados, through the eyes of a young boy, Lamming portrays the social, racial, political and urban struggles with which Barbados continues to grapple even with some thirty-three years of Political Independence from Britain.
  

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Review: In the Castle of My Skin

User Review  - Suhasini Srihari - Goodreads

"In the Castle of my Skin" was a real slow read. I had to literally drag myself through the pages. However, Lamming writes of the subtle issues of how colonization paved its way into the orient ... Read full review

Review: In the Castle of My Skin

User Review  - Nicholas Knight - Goodreads

The Book in my opinion is an excellent piece of work in that it paints an ideal picture of the impact in which colonialism had on the minds of Barbadians. Lamming's use of use of literary devices such as symbolism were cleverly used. well done. Read full review

Contents

Foreword
ix
Introduction
xxxv
IN THE CASTLE OF MY SKIN
7
2
16
3
35
4
76
5
91
6
109
8
183
9
189
1O
209
11
213
12
228
13
233
14
258
Copyright

7
159

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About the author (1991)

Born in Carrington Village, Barbados, Lamming taught in Trinidad and Venezuela before going to England in 1950. In England, he worked in a factory and also hosted a book program for the BBC West Indian Service while pursuing his writing. Lamming's works are a panorama of West Indian history with a strong sense of nationalism. In the Castle of My Skin (1953) is at least partially autobiographical in its presentation of the protagonist's growing sense of individuality and his consequent estrangement from the village and folk community. The subsequent exile of this protagonist is told in The Emigrants (1954), his return is the focus in Of Age and Innocence (1958), and the reclamation of his heritage is the major theme in Season of Adventure (1960). His novels focus on the social and economic changes taking place in the Caribbean, and he uses his protagonists as mouthpieces for his own ideas.

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