O, how the Wheel Becomes It!

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Green Integer, Dec 1, 2002 - Fiction - 188 pages
2 Reviews
Fiction. Reprint. The great British writer's penultimate fiction returns us to the satiric wit of his early novels, Afternoon Men, What's Become of Waring and From a View to a Death. Having completed his great twelve volume A Dance to the Music of Time, Powell tells the story in O, HOW THE WHEEL BECOMES IT! of a British literary celebrity who is not an important writer, is no great personality, and certainly is no cause for celebration of the human species. G.F.H. Shadbold, a lifelong poseur and literary manque, lives, for the most part, in fear of discovery. A friend, Cedric Winterwarde, who Shadbold evidently seduced in his college days, writes a novel almost as insignificant and badly written as Shadbold's own literary output. As time passes, however, and the "friend" is killed in the army, Winterwade's novel begins to be rediscovered while Shadbold's work remains ignored. The discovery that Winterwade has penned a journal sets the stage for a hilarious series of events, ending in Shadbold's justifiable downfall from grace as he discovers that his friend has revealed not only Shadbold's sexual indsicretions, but has described his own affair with a woman with whom Shadbold had been in love.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stillatim - LibraryThing

There's a pretty big difference between this and Powell's 'A Dance to the Music of Time.' DMT is enormous, and this is short; DMT is fantastic, and this is okay. On the other hand, they both deal with ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - benjaminjudge - LibraryThing

Despite it's short length this novel manages to say a few nice things about death, particularly it's timing, and contains some nice digs at the progression of the academic study of literature. Death ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
14
Section 3
21
Copyright

3 other sections not shown

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About the author (2002)

Anthony Powell was born on December 21, 1905 in Westminster, England and was educated at Eton College and Balliol College, Oxford. In 1926 he became an editor at Duckworth & Co. and later moved on to be a scriptwriter for Warner Brothers. By 1937 he was a regular contributor to The Spectator and the Daily Telegraph. From 1953-1959 Powell was the Literary Editor of Punch. His first book, The Barnard Letter, was published in 1928 and his first novel, Afternoon Men, was published in 1931. In 1951 Powell published A Question of Upbringing, which was the first of the 12-novel sequence A Dance to the Music of Time. In 1975 he published Hearing Secret Harmonies, which was the last novel of the sequence. Powell wrote Infants of the Spring, which is part of To Keep the Ball Rolling, his memoirs. He also published The Fisher King in 1986. Anthony Powell died peacefully at his home, The Chantry, aged 94 on 28 March 2000

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