Notes on the War Between China and Japan; the European Autumn Maneuvers of 1896, Orders Instructions, Etc (Google eBook)

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1896 - 208 pages
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Page 37 - Devoted as we unalterably are, and ever have been, to the principles of peace, we were constrained to take up arms against China for no other reason than our desire to secure for the orient an enduring peace.
Page 14 - ... point, the entire Eleventh and Twelfth Corps from the Army of the Potomac forming the principal commands. The Federals became much the stronger, but Bragg did not. abandon his siege of Chattanooga. Recalling the advance of Burnside from the Ohio to the relief of Rosecrans, it should be stated that he did not arrive in time to take part in the battle of Chickamauga, but occupied Knoxville on the 9th of September. Bragg sent Longstreet with a strong force to attack Burnside, the Confederate commander...
Page 37 - China for no other reason than our desire to secure for the Orient an enduring peace. Now the friendly recommendation of the three powers was equally prompted by the same desire. Consulting, therefore, the best interests of peace and animated by a desire not to bring upon our people added hardship or to impede the progress of national destiny by creating new complications and thereby making the situation difficult and retarding the restoration of peace, we do not hesitate to accept such recommendation.
Page 37 - China, and in consequence appointed plenipotentiaries and caused them to confer with the plenipotentiaries appointed by China and to conclude a Treaty of Peace between the two Empires. Since then the Governments of their Majesties the Emperors of Russia and Germany and of the Republic of France have united in a recommendation to our Government not to permanently possess the peninsula of Feng-t'ien, our newly-acquired territory, on the ground that such permanent possession would be detrimental to...
Page 41 - ... largest military unit is the division. It possesses six of these, besides the Imperial Bodyguard, which may also be considered as a division, which it almost equals in numerical strength. The formation of these divisions is not entirely uniform ; they all have two brigades or four regiments of infantry, but the artillery, cavalry, engineers, and train attached to each division vary slightly in number. An infantry regiment is formed by three battalions of four companies each; a cavalry battalion...
Page 41 - January 21, 1889, every Japanese subject is liable to military service at the age of twenty; remains for three years in the active army (or four years in the navy), four years in the reserve (or three years in the naval reserve), and five years in the territorial army. Besides these forces, every male between the ages of seventeen and forty forms part of the national army. It is perhaps necessary to inform the English reader that this sweeping conscription is not, and never can be, entirely carried...
Page 37 - ... cities heretofore closed; the extension to Japanese steam navigation of several rivers in China, and the security of certain rights to Japanese subjects in China; Japan to evacuate Chinese territory within three months, but to occupy Weihaiwei temporarily, at the partial expense of China, as a guaranty of the faithful performance of the stipulations of the treaty; prisoners of war to be exchanged, and Chinese prisoners of war and Chinese subjects who may have been compromised in their relations...
Page 33 - ... of the landing place, the fleet took position off Weihaiwei, watching the Chinese fleet. The rest of the transports sailed in two detachments, one on the 20th, the second on the 22d, and all the troops were landed by the 23d, though it took several days longer to land the impedimenta. The harbor of Weihaiwei was defended against attack from the sea by strong earthworks on the mainland and islands, whose heavy guns commanded both entrances. The eastern group on the mainland had for defense on...
Page 104 - DF.CISIONS.—The rules laid down for umpires are to be regarded only in the light of general principles for assisting them in giving decisions. Even at maneuvers circumstances will arise that can not be met by definite rules. In all decisions special importance must be attached to moral influences so far as they obtain in peace, as shown by the order and steadiness of the men and the efficient exercise of command.
Page 42 - (Kumamoto) . . . 10,271 Total .... 63,693 The Reserve contains 91,190 men, and the territorial army 106,088 men, so that in time of war each Japanese division is reinforced by about 13,000 men, ready to be marched to the seat of war, besides about 15,000 which remain for the defence of the country. But the cadres are insufficient for such a large force, and it is doubtful whether on a war-footing a Japanese division ever reaches 20,000 men.

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