North of Hope

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Ballantine Books, 1990 - Fiction - 435 pages
21 Reviews
"Hassler's brilliance has always been his ability to achieve the depth of real literature through such sure-handed, no-gimmicks, honest language that the result appears effortless."
THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW
After more than twenty years in the priesthood, Father Frank Healy is going home. But what he finds at the battered Our Lady's Church are very few believers and Libby Girard, a woman from his past, whom he thought he'd never see again. But Libby's life is unraveling, and as she becomes dependent on him, the lives around them erupt in a tangle of drugs and despair, alcoholism and death. Ultimately, Frank's vocation is tested at its weakest place: his continuing love for Libby.

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Review: North of Hope

User Review  - JodiP - Goodreads

This is the second book I've read by Hassler; I began with Staggerford which I recall I liked quite a bit. So, this thing clocks in at 673 pages. I got to about 150, and thought, Christ, what more can ... Read full review

Review: North of Hope

User Review  - Mary Ellen - Goodreads

One of my favorite books by one of my favorite writers: the story of Fr. Frank Healy hitting the "big leak" of a midlife crisis as he accompanies his high school crush and best friend through her own ... Read full review

Contents

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3
2
5
3
9
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

Author Jon Hassler was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota on March 30, 1933. He received his bachelor's degree from St. John's University in 1955 before going on to the University of North Dakota for his master's degree. After graduating from college, he taught high school English for the next 10 years. In 1970, while teaching at Brainerd Community College, he became interested in writing fictional stories. Hassler's first novel, Staggerford, a story of a small-town school teacher, was chosen Novel of the Year in 1978 by the Friends of American Writers. In 1987, Hassler's fifth novel, Grand Opening, a tale told from the point of view of a twelve-year-old boy living in the corrupt town of Plainview, Minnesota, won the Best Fiction Award, given by the Society of Midland Authors. Granted honorary Doctor of Letters degrees by Assumption College, the University of North Dakota, and the University of Notre Dame, he has also received fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and the Minnesota State Arts Board. He died, after years of suffering from progressive supranuclear palsy, on March 20, 2008.

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