The Algerine Captive

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Rowman & Littlefield, 1970 - Fiction - 224 pages
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Mental health professionals should be attuned to the ideal of compassionate understanding even when faced with clinical and social questions of a large scope: What if the patient is a family rather than an individual? Or a small group, a large group, an organization, a community, or social institution? What if the patient is a whole culture? If all of these are cases in need, can psychiatric assessment of them provide the necessary understanding and devise appropriate and workable forms of help? What are the next evolutions of psychiatric diagnosis and what are the differences in human well-being they can make? The papers in this book are attempts to come to grips with these questions, one by one, cautiously or boldly, according to each author's outlook and temperament.
  

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Contents

VOLUME I
31
CHAPTER 2
37
CHAPTER 3
41
CHAPTER 4
43
CHAPTER 5
45
CHAPTER 6
48
CHAPTER 7
51
CHAPTER 8
56
CHAPTER 4
129
CHAPTER 5
133
CHAPTER 6
136
CHAPTER 7
139
CHAPTER 8
144
CHAPTER 9
146
CHAPTER 10
149
CHAPTER 11
151

CHAPTER 9
58
CHAPTER 10
63
CHAPTER 11
65
CHAPTER 12
67
CHAPTER 13
72
CHAPTER 14
74
CHAPTER 15
76
CHAPTER 16
77
CHAPTER 17
78
CHAPTER 18
79
CHAPTER 19
81
CHAPTER 20
83
CHAPTER 21
87
CHAPTER 22
89
CHAPTER 23
90
CHAPTER 24
93
CHAPTER 25
96
CHAPTER 26
99
CHAPTER 27
101
CHAPTER 28
103
CHAPTER 29
105
CHAPTER 30
107
CHAPTER 31
111
CHAPTER 32
115
VOLUME II
121
CHAPTER 2
124
CHAPTER 3
126
CHAPTER 12
152
CHAPTER 13
154
CHAPTER 14
156
CHAPTER 15
159
CHAPTER 16
168
CHAPTER 17
170
CHAPTER 18
172
CHAPTER 19
174
CHAPTER 20
175
CHAPTER 21
177
CHAPTER 22
180
CHAPTER 23
184
CHAPTER 24
186
CHAPTER 25
188
CHAPTER 26
191
CHAPTER 27
194
CHAPTER 28
197
CHAPTER 29
199
CHAPTER 30
201
CHAPTER 31
207
CHAPTER 32
213
CHAPTER 33
215
CHAPTER 34
217
CHAPTER 35
219
CHAPTER 36
220
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Page 27 - Novels almost as incredible . . . and therefore, no sooner was a taste for amusing literature diffused than all orders of country life, with one accord, forsook the sober sermons and Practical Pieties of their fathers for the gay stories and splendid impieties of the Traveller and the Novelist. The worthy farmer no longer fatigued himself with Bunyan's Pilgrim up "the hill of difficulty...

About the author (1970)

When Royall Tyler courted the young Abigail Adams, her father, John Adams (see Vol. 3), wrote to his wife that he disapproved of Tyler's suit. He suggested that Tyler drop his literary aspirations and focus on the law. A man of contrasts, Royall Tyler found neither occupation mutually exclusive; he distinguished himself as a lawyer and a military officer, as well as a poet and dramatist. Born William Clark Tyler to a well-established Boston family on July 18, 1757, Tyler was quickly schooled in colonial politics. His father was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives and was actively opposed to British interference. When the senior Tyler died in 1771, his fourteen-year-old son adopted his father's name---Royall. Tyler graduated from Harvard and received an honorary degree from Yale. In 1779 he was awarded a Master of Arts degree from Harvard, and in 1780 he was admitted to the Massachusetts bar. During his college years, Tyler served briefly as a military aide in 1778. During the 1780s, Tyler acted on the government's behalf in quelling Shays's Rebellion, a farmer's revolt in western Massachusetts. Tyler proved himself an excellent counselor and barrister; in 1807 he became chief justice of the Supreme Court of Vermont, as well as a trustee and law professor at the University of Vermont. In 1794 Tyler married Mary Palmer, the daughter of the family with whom he had resided during the time of Shays's Rebellion. Concurrent with his civic career, Royall Tyler enjoyed another vocation. A prolific writer, particularly of drama, Tyler saw his first play, The Contrast, produced in 1787. Like much of his work, this play dealt with the theme of American exceptionalism. Unlike some of his contemporaries, Tyler refused to mimic continental themes and forms and sought to create uniquely American works. Critics have commented at some length on his use of dialect and satire and upon his indictment of duplicitous European influences on the naive and upright American character. Tyler's papers and manuscripts are collected at the Vermont Historical Society, Montpelier, Vermont.

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