Reconstruction After the Civil War: Second Edition

Front Cover
University of Chicago Press, 1994 - History - 265 pages
3 Reviews
Ever since its original publication in 1961, Reconstruction after the Civil War has been praised for cutting through the controversial scholarship and popular myths of the time to provide an accurate account of the role of former slaves during this period in American history.

Now Franklin has updated his work to acknowledge the enormous body of research and scholarship that followed in the wake of the first edition. New are Franklin’s references to important, later texts that enrich the original narrative. In addition, the extensive bibliography has been thoroughly revised.

What has not changed, however, is the foundation Franklin has laid. Still compelling are his arguments concerning the brevity of the North’s military occupation of the South, the limited amount of power wielded by former slaves, the influence of moderate southerners, the flaws of the constitutions drawn up by the Radical state governments, and the reasons for the downfall of Reconstruction.
  

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Review: Reconstruction after the Civil War (The Chicago History of American Civilization)

User Review  - Edward Moore - Goodreads

A very balanced, brief history of Reconstruction, an incredibly important period in our history. It has had repercussions all the way down to today. So many of the assumptions about it are just wrong. Read full review

Review: Reconstruction after the Civil War (The Chicago History of American Civilization)

User Review  - Lisa - Goodreads

Very informative and readable. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

The Aftermath of War
3
Presidential Peacemaking
16
Reconstruction Confederate Style
34
Confederate Reconstruction under Fire
55
Challenge by Congress
71
The Souths New Leaders
86
Constitutionmaking in the Radical South
106
ReconstructionBlack and White
129
Economic and Social Reconstruction
174
The Era Begins To End
193
The Aftermath of Redemption
215
Important Dates
225
Suggested Reading
229
Acknowledgments
239
Index
241
Copyright

Counter Reconstruction
152

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About the author (1994)

John Hope Franklin was the James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of History, and for seven years was Professor of Legal History in the Law School at Duke University. He was a native of Oklahoma and a graduate of Fisk University. He received the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees in history from Harvard University. He has taught at a number of institutions, including Fisk University, St. Augustine's College, North Carolina Central University, and Howard University. In 1956 he went to Brooklyn College as Chairman of the Department of History; and in 1964, he joined the faculty of the University of Chicago, serving as Chairman of the Department of History from 1967 to 1970. At Chicago, he was the John Matthews Manly Distinguished Service Professor from 1969 to 1982, when he became Professor Emeritus.

Professor Franklin's numerous publications include The Emancipation Proclamation, The Militant South, The Free Negro in North Carolina, Reconstruction After the Civil War, and A Southern Odyssey: Travelers in the Ante-bellum North. Perhaps his best known book is From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African-Americans, now in its seventh edition. His Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities for 1976 was published in 1985 and received the Clarence L. Holte Literary Prize for that year. In 1990, a collection of essays covering a teaching and writing career of fifty years, was published under the title, Race and History: Selected Essays, 1938-1988. In 1993, he published The Color Line: Legacy for the Twenty-first Century. Professor Franklin's most recent book, My Life and an Era: The Autobiography of Buck Colbert Franklin, is an autobiography of his father that he edited with his son, John Whittington Franklin. His research at the time of his death dealt with "Dissidents on the Plantation: Runaway Slaves."

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