Sovereign Nations Or Reservations?: An Economic History of American Indians

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Pacific Research Institute for Public Policy, 1995 - Business & Economics - 202 pages
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The lifestyle of American Indians before European settlers arrived several centuries ago is often held up today as a model of environmental sensitivity and communitarian cooperation. But is it really true? In this bold book, Terry Anderson debunks much of the romanticism surrounding American Indian culture. American Indians, he argues, developed forms of property rights, contracts, and market exchanges resembling those used by modern Western cultures. Anderson further argues that much of the poverty among Indian tribes living on reservations today is due to U.S. government policies that deprive Indians of their property rights and impose collective decision making on them unnaturally. We do a great disservice to Indians, Anderson concludes, by imposing on them not only our bureaucracy but also a romantic image of Indian life that does not square with the historical record.

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Contents

CHAPTER I
1
CHAPTER 2
23
CHAPTER 3
29
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Terry L. Anderson is Executive Director of the Political Economy Research Center (PERC), in Bozeman, Montana and Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University.
Donald R. Leal is a Senior Associate at PERC, editor or author of three books, and contributing author to six books that cover various aspects of environmental policy.

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