The Absolute Sandman, Volume 4

Front Cover
DC Comics, 2009 - Comic books, strips, etc - 600 pages
97 Reviews
Collects several tales of the Dream King--or Morpheus--and his siblings, including Delirium, who asks her older brother to help search the Waking World for Destruction, who is missing, which results in strained relationships between several family members.

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Review: The Absolute Sandman, Vol. 2 (The Sandman #4-6)

User Review  - Chris Arnone - Goodreads

It's hard not to just gush about a beautiful volume of an amazing series. Like many, however, A Game of You is not my favorite Sandman story, so it feels like a bit of a slog compared to some other ... Read full review

Review: The Absolute Sandman, Vol. 5 (Sandman Edición Absolute #5)

User Review  - Patrick Hurley - Goodreads

Mostly stories I'd already read collected in one huge bound volume, but there were a few new things in here that I'd never heard of and was glad to read. This was a library find, which I'm glad of. Don't think I would have paid for this one in stores. Nice find though! Read full review

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About the author (2009)

Neil Richard MacKinnon Gaiman was born in Portchester, England on November 10, 1960. Gaiman worked as a journalist and freelance writer for a time, before deciding to try his hand at comic books. Some of his work has appeared in publications such as Time Out, The Sunday Times, Punch and The Observer. His first comic endeavor was the graphic novel series The Sandman. It is the comic book he is most famous for and the series has won every major industry award, including nine Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards, three Harvey Awards, and the 1991 World Fantasy Award for best short story, making it the first comic ever to win a literary award. Gaiman writes both children and adult books. His most recent adult title, The Ocean at the End of the Lane, has won numerous awards, most notably: the British National Book Awards, Book of the Year for 2013, and the Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel for 2014 . His other adult books include: Stardust, which won the Mythopoeic Award as best novel for adults in 1999; American Gods, which won the Hugo, Nebula, Bram Stoker, SFX, and Locus awards; and Anansi Boys. His children's books include The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish; Coraline, which won the Elizabeth Burr/Worzalla, the BSFA, the Hugo, the Nebula, and the Bram Stoker awards; The Wolves in the Walls; and The Graveyard Book, which won the Newbery Award in 2009. He also co-wrote Good Omens with Terry Pratchett.

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