The Complete Nonsense of Edward Lear

Front Cover
Holbrook Jackson
Courier Dover Publications, 1951 - Humor - 288 pages
10 Reviews

Every line of every nonsense book written by the celebrated humorist, illustrated by more than 500 of his quirky drawings. Poems range from "The Owl and the Pussycat" to lesser-known delights, including "The Jumblies," "The Nutcrackers and the Sugar Tongs," and "The History of the Seven Young Owls," plus more than 200 limericks. Includes 2 selections from the Common Core State Standards Initiative: "The Owl and the Pussycat" and "The Jumblies."

  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
2
3 stars
1
2 stars
2
1 star
0

Review: The Complete Nonsense of Edward Lear

User Review  - Sara - Goodreads

5 stars for The Owl and the Pussycat, the Jumblies, and Self-Portrait. 1-2 stars for almost everything else in this cursed book. You'd think "nonsense" would be more fun to read, but this was an ... Read full review

Review: The Complete Nonsense of Edward Lear

User Review  - Araceli Esparza - Goodreads

Wanna laugh read this book! its an oldie but a goodie! Read full review

Contents

II
1
III
59
IV
153
V
223
VI
273
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page vii - How pleasant to know Mr. Lear! Who has written such volumes of stuff! Some think him ill-tempered and queer, But a few think him pleasant enough.
Page xvi - ... that all is for the best in the best of all possible worlds...

References to this book

Victorian Fantasy
Stephen Prickett
Limited preview - 2005
All Book Search results »

About the author (1951)

Edward Lear was born in Holloway, England, to Jeremiah (a stockbroker) and Ann Lear, tutored at home by his sister, and briefly attended the Royal Academy schools. Both an author and an illustrator, he earned his living as an artist from the age of 15, mainly by doing landscapes. What he is remembered for is his nonsense books, especially his popularization of the limerick. Along with Lewis Carroll, he is considered to be the founder of nonsense poetry. In addition to his limericks, he created longer nonsense poems. The best---and best known---is The Jumblies, in which the title characters go to sea in a sieve; it is a brilliant, profound, silly, and sad expression of the need to leave the security of the known world and experience the wonder and danger of the unknown. His other most notable work is The Owl and the Pussy Cat, a less complex poem whose title characters also go to sea. Lear produced humorous alphabets and botany books as well. His wordplay, involving puns, neologisms, portmanteau words, and anticlimax, retains its vitality today and has influenced such contemporary writers of children's nonsense verse as Shel Silverstein, Ogden Nash, and Laura Richards

Bibliographic information