the british drama  (Google eBook)

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Page 358 - The wide, the unbounded prospect lies before me; But shadows, clouds, and darkness rest upon it. Here will I hold. If there's a power above us And that there is, all nature cries aloud Through all her works He must delight in virtue; And that which He delights in must be happy.
Page 358 - Why shrinks the soul Back on herself, and startles at destruction ? 'Tis the divinity that stirs within us; 'Tis Heaven itself that points out an hereafter, And intimates eternity to man.
Page 346 - Twill never be too late To sue for chains, and own a conqueror. Why should Rome fall a moment ere her time ? No, let us draw her term of freedom out In its full length, and spin it to the last, So shall we gain still one day's liberty: And let me perish, but, in Cato's judgment, A day, an hour, of virtuous liberty Is worth a whole eternity in bondage.
Page 248 - Oh woman ! lovely woman ! Nature made thee To temper man : we had been brutes without you ! Angels are painted fair to look like you : There's in you all, that we believe of" heaven ; Amazing brightness, purity and truth, Eternal joy, and everlasting love.
Page 210 - Heaven has but Our sorrow for our sins ; and then delights To pardon erring man : Sweet mercy seems Its darling attribute, which limits justice ; . As if there were degrees in infinite, And infinite would rather want perfection,. * Than punish to extent, Ant.
Page 10 - Do my face (If thou had'st ever feeling of a sorrow) Thus, thus, Antiphila : strive to make me look Like Sorrow's monument ; and the trees about me, Let them be dry and leafless ; let the rocks Groan with continual surges ; and behind me, Make all a desolation.
Page 10 - To show a soul so full of misery As this sad lady's was. Do it by me, Do it again by me, the lost Aspatia ; And you shall find all true but the wild island. Suppose I stand upon the sea-beach now...
Page 191 - Nay, stop not. Ant. Antony, Well, thou wilt have it, like a coward, fled, Fled while his soldiers fought ; fled first, Ventidius. Thou long'st to curse me, and I give thee leave. I know thou cam'st prepared to rail. Vent. I did.
Page 276 - Looking tranquillity ! It strikes an awe And terror on my aching sight ; the tombs And monumental caves of death look cold, And shoot a dullness to my trembling heart.
Page 33 - Of which he borrow'd some to quench his thirst, And paid the nymph again as much in tears. A garland lay him by, made by himself, Of many several flowers, bred in the...

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