History of the French revolution, tr. by C. Cocks (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1847
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
1
II
13
III
17
IV
23
V
26
VI
32
VII
35
VIII
38
XVII
84
XVIII
95
XIX
108
XX
118
XXI
132
XXII
142
XXIII
161
XXIV
176

IX
43
X
45
XI
48
XII
51
XIII
55
XIV
58
XV
62
XVI
73
XXV
190
XXVI
204
XXVII
217
XXVIII
230
XXIX
237
XXX
249
XXXI
267

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 116 - Monsieur, tell those who sent you that we are here by the will of the People, and that nothing but the force of bayonets shall send us hence...
Page 100 - BO necessary, that I would rather live at Constantinople than in France if he had it not. Yes, I declare I know nothing more terrible than the sovereign aristocracy of six hundred persons, who might to-morrow render themselves irrevocable, hereditary the day after, and end, like the aristocracies of every country in the world, by invading everything.
Page 151 - Bastille into the air, buried one hundred thousand people beneath its ruins, and have demolished one-third of Paris. Two subaltern officers crossed their bayonets before him and prevented the accomplishment of this horrible design. Some wretches seized upon a young lady whom they believed to be the governor's daughter, and wished by the threat of burning her within view of her father upon the towers to compel him to surrender. But the citizens promptly rescued her from their hands and conveyed her...
Page 10 - A thing to be told to everybody, and which it is but too easy to prove, is, that the humane and benevolent period of our Revolution had for its actors the very people, the whole people, — everybody. And the period of violence, the period of sanguinary deeds, into which danger afterwards thrust it, had for actors but an inconsiderable, an extremely small number of men. That is what I have found established and verified, either by written testimony, or by such as I have gathered from the lips of...
Page 11 - Nobody can behold that marvellous unanimity, in which the self-same heart beat together in the breasts of twenty millions of men, without returning thanks to God. These are the sacred days of the world - thrice happy days for history.
Page 212 - Perhaps, if they had acted in concert and rallied together, they might for some time have arrested the Revolution. It found them dispersed, isolated, and weak in their loneliness. Another cause of their weakness, very honourable for them, was, that many of them were in heart against themselves, — against the old feudal tyranny, and that they were at the same time its heirs and its enemies ; educated in the generous ideas of the philosophy of the time, they applauded that marvellous resuscitation...
Page 2 - ... resuscitate, to awaken remote and departed ages. But thee they would have wished to bury. Yet why? Thou, thou alone dost live. Thou livest! I feel this truth perpetually impressed upon me at the present period of the year, when my teaching is suspended, —when labour grows fatiguing, and the season becomes oppressive. Then I wander to the Champ de Mars, I sit me down on the parched grass, and inhale the strong breeze that is wafted across the arid plain. The Champ de Mars! This is the only monument...
Page 88 - Menus. That hall, which unfortunately no longer exists, was immense ; it was able to contain, besides the twelve hundred deputies, four thousand auditors. An ocular witness, Madame de Stael, Necker's daughter, who had gone thither to behold her father applauded, tells us accordingly that he was so, and that on Mirabeau taking his place, a few murmurs were heard. Murmurs against the immoral man ? That brilliant society, dying of its vices, and present at its last festival, had no right to be severe...
Page 78 - They drew up into a formula the general demands ; and they were the demands of the mute masses as much as, and more than their own. Oh ! who would not be touched by the remembrance of that unrivalled moment, when we started into life ? It was shortlived ; but it remains for us the ideal whereunto we shall ever tend, the hope of the future ! O sublime Concord, in which the rising liberties of classes, subsequently in opposition, embraced so tenderly, like brothers in the cradle, — shall we never...
Page 84 - Snores laid for it.— (4th of May to 9th of June, 1789.) ON the eve of the opening of the States-General, the Mass of the Holy Ghost was solemnly said at Versailles. It was certainly that day or never, that they might sing the prophetic hymn : — " Thou wilt create peoples, and the face of the earth shall he renewed.

Bibliographic information