Poems of Paul Celan

Front Cover
Anvil Press Poetry, May 3, 2007 - Poetry - 429 pages
11 Reviews
Paul Celan was one of the great poets of the twentieth century. Born into a Jewish family in a German enclave of Romania, his life and work were indelibly marked by the Holocaust: his parents perished in a camp, he was lucky to survive. The Jewish experience and the force of history stretched language, and Clean himself, beyond breaking point. Celan committed suicide in Paris in 1970, but not before he had remade and reclaimed German as a language fit for poets. Clean spoke of a language `north of the future' and described his poems as messages in bottles that might never be received. Of necessity difficult at times, the very force, originality and complexity of Clean's poetry prevents the patina of familiarity from forming over the Holocaust. As Michael Hamburger notes in his introduction, rather than depicting the Holocaust realistically Celan deployed `an art of contrast and allusion that celebrates beauty while commemorating destruction'.

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Review: Poems of Paul Celan

User Review  - Harperac - Goodreads

A key moment in reading this book was the thought "Oh! Celan is just like Lorca!" But while the Spanish modernist's use of surreal and disjunctive imagery seemed to affirm some kind of subconscious ... Read full review

Review: Poems of Paul Celan

User Review  - Stan Murai - Goodreads

This is a anthology of selected poems by Paul Celan, born as Paul Antsche to a German-speaking Jewish family in Romania, who became a major German language poet and translator of the post-World War II ... Read full review

Contents

Preface to the Third Edition
19
from Licht zwang 1970
36
Talglicht
42
Tallow Lamp
43
Ein Knirschen von eisernen Schuhn
56
In the cherry trees branches
57
Todesfuge
70
Death Fugue
71
SchattenGebräch
256
Ways in the shadowrockslide
257
Wortaufschüttung
262
Pilingon of words
263
Keine Sandkunst mehr
268
Erblinde
274
Sewn under the skin
277
Die Gauklertrommel
280

Von Dunkel zu Dunkel
84
From Darkness to Darkness
85
Auch heute abend
88
This Evening Also
89
Mit wechselndem Schlüssel
94
In Memoriam Paul Eluard
100
Shibboleth
103
Sprich auch du
106
Die Winzer
112
Zuversicht
118
Confidence
119
Heimkehr
124
White and Light
133
Sprachgitter
136
Matière de Bretagne
142
All Souls
147
Entwurf einer Landschaft
148
Niedrigwasser
156
Es war Erde in ihnen
174
There was earth inside them
175
Soviel Gestirne
180
So many constellations
181
Eis Eden
194
Ice Eden
195
Radix Matrix
208
Radix Matrix
209
Anabasis
222
Anabasis
223
Les Globes
238
Les Globes
239
Das Geschriebene
286
Kings rage
291
Solve
292
Ein Dröhnen
298
Dunstbänder SpruchbänderAufstand
304
Uprising of smoke banners word banners
305
Ewigkeiten
310
Irisch
316
and no kind of
319
Denk dir
322
Hörreste Sehreste
326
Scraps of heard of seen things
327
Bei Brancusi zu zweit
332
Wie du
338
can still see you
341
Oranienstraße 1
344
Sperriges Morgen
350
Leapcenturies
355
Wirk nicht voraus
356
Brunnengräber
362
Die nachzustotternde Welt
368
World to be stuttered by heart
369
Ein Blatt
374
Wanderstaude du fängst dir
378
Walking plant you catch
379
Translators Note on Wolfsbohne
395
Index of German Titles or First Lines
423
Zürich the Stork Inn 179
429
Copyright

About the author (2007)

Born in Bukovina (now part of Romania) Celan saw his father and mother die because of the Nazi take over of their country and their imprisonment in camps. He spent most of his life in Paris writing in German before committing suicide.

Author Michael Hamburger was born on March 24, 1924 in the Berlin district of Charlottenburg. Hamburger was the author of more than 20 volumes of poetry and many volumes of essays. He was also a critic and translator of German works. He received numerous awards, including awards for his dedication toward making the riches of German literature accessible to English-speaking readers. His translations twice won the Schlegel-Tieck Prize, and he was awarded the Goethe Medal (1986) and the European translation prize (1990). He held a series of teaching positions, initially in Germanic studies, on both sides of the Atlantic, including University College London, Reading University, Mount Holyoke College, Massachusetts, and the University of California at San Diego. He died on June 7, 2007, aged 83.

Bibliographic information