Slaughterhouse: The Shocking Story of Greed, Neglect, and Inhumane Treatment Inside the U.S. Meat Industry

Front Cover
Prometheus Books, 2007 - Business & Economics - 328 pages
19 Reviews
What started out, with a single complaint about a Florida slaughterhouse turned into a tale of intrigue and suspense as investigator Gail A. Eisnitz unearthed more startling information about the meat and poultry Americans consume. This shocking story follows Eisnitz as she becomes submerged in a slaughterhouse subculture, venturing deeper and deeper into the lives of the workers. As the stakes become higher in her David-and-Goliath-type battle, this determined young woman finds herself courageously taking on one of America's most powerful industries. Slaughterhouse takes readers on a frightening but true journey from one slaughterhouse to another throughout the country. Along the way we encounter example after example of mistreated animals...intolerable working conditions...lax standards...the slow, painful deaths of children killed as a result of eating contaminated meat...the author's battle with the major television networks...and a dangerously corrupt federal agency that chooses to do nothing rather than risk the wrath of agribusiness...before the whole affair is blown wide open in this powerful expose. In an effort to understand how such rampant violations could occur right under the noses of U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) inspectors - the individuals charged with enforcing humane regulations in slaughterhouses - Eisnitz examines the inspectors' track record for enforcing meat and poultry safety regulations, their primary responsibility. Following a long paper trail, she learns that contaminated meat and poultry are pouring out of federally inspected slaughterhouses and, not surprisingly, deaths from foodborne illness have quadrupled in the United States in the lastfifteen years. Determined to tell the whole story, Eisnitz then examines the physical price paid by employees working in one of America's most dangerous industries. In addition to suffering disfiguring injuries and crippling repetitive motion disorders, employees describe tyrannical working conditions in which grievances are met with severe reprisals or dismissals.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
9
4 stars
5
3 stars
4
2 stars
1
1 star
0

Review: Slaughterhouse: The Shocking Story of Greed, Neglect, And Inhumane Treatment Inside the US Meat Industry

User Review  - Johnnie - Goodreads

This is one of the most important books I've ever read. Whether you eat meat or not, everyone in America should read this book. Nothing has changed since Upton Sinclair wrote "The Jungle." In fact ... Read full review

Review: Slaughterhouse: The Shocking Story of Greed, Neglect, And Inhumane Treatment Inside the US Meat Industry

User Review  - Lindsey Benage - Goodreads

Yet another life changer on this topic... I can say that for me I didn't really learn anything new about the torturous ways we treat animals many call food but that is solely due to the fact that I ... Read full review

Contents

Acknowledgments
9
The Stickers Confessions
59
The Man with the Scar
61
Copyright

28 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

Gail A. Eisnitz (San Rafael, CA), winner of the Albert Schweitzer Medal for outstanding achievement in animal welfare, is the chief investigator for the Humane Farming Association. Her work has resulted in exposés by ABC’s Good Morning America, PrimeTime Live, and Dateline NBC, and her interviews have been heard on more than 1,000 radio stations. Her work has been featured in such newspapers as The New York Times, Miami Herald, Detroit Free Press, Texas Monthly, Denver Business Journal, Los Angeles Times, and US News & World Report. Eisnitz was the driving force behind a front-page exposé in The Washington Post documenting slaughterhouse atrocities. The Washington Post reporter later described Eisnitz as "the most courageous investigator I’ve ever seen." The story was one of the highest reader-response pieces ever run by The Washington Post.

Bibliographic information