THE GEOLOGY OF THE ROUTE (Google eBook)

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Page 96 - ... depth. Here, too, we find carbonate of lime; it occurs in rhombohedral crystals. These mines are much more extensively worked than those of Real Viejo, and, notwithstanding the scarcity of water, I have been told by several persons that not less than 2,000 people congregate here in the winter season, when they can get water from the snows. These workers spend the greater part of their time under ground, living on "atole...
Page 23 - ... Under date of June 14, 1849, in his log book, Captain Marcy says: "Leaving camp early this morning, we travelled two miles on our course when we encountered a spur of the plain running too far east for us to pass around; and finding a very easy ascent to the summit, I took the road over the plain. When we were upon the high tableland, a view presented itself as boundless as the ocean. Not a tree, shrub or any other object, either animate or inanimate, relieved the dreary monotony of the prospect...
Page 93 - ... the wells, so that the village looked like a village of gigantic prairie dogs. Nearly all the people there were at their wells, and were drawing up bags of loose sand by means of windlasses. Around little pools, men, women, and children were grouped, intently poring over these bags of loose sand, washing the earth in wooden platters or goat horns. One cannot but feel pity for these miserable wretches, and congratulate himself that he does not possess a gold mine.
Page 168 - ... Hemiaster, large Ammonites, &c. This neocomien has been almost wholly destroyed and carried away by denudations, for it is only found on the summits of the hills, resembling the remains of ancient buildings ; it occupies actually only a width of three or four miles. Probably at the time of the deposite it covered more space ; but, as at Fort Washita, where it has been very little denuded, it is only twentyfive or thirty miles wide. This shows it to have been but a narrow bend in the immense basin...
Page 93 - In the evening we visited a town at the base of the principal mountain; here, mingled with the houses, were huge mounds of earth, thrown out from the wells, so that the village looked like a village of gigantic prairie dogs. Nearly all the people there were at their wells, and were drawing up bags of loose sand by means of windlasses. Around little pools, men, women, and children were grouped, intently poring over these bags of loose sand, washing the earth in wooden platters or goat horns. One cannot...
Page 167 - As it is the first time the neocomien has been recognised in North America, where, until now, only the green-sand and chalk-marl, or lower chalk, have been found, I will add that these strata are much more developed at Fort Washita, where Dr.
Page 166 - America, page 42,) attains a very considerable development, and, according to my observations, has a thickness of four or five thousand feet.
Page 19 - No. 31, where upon the heights are found the remains of beds of a limestone filled with shells, which I connect with the Neocomian of Europe, or in other words with the Lower Division of the Cretaceous Rocks. This limestone is only five feet thick ; it is of a whitish gray color, containing an immense quantity of Ostracea, which I consider as identical with the Exogyra (Gryphcea) Pitcheri Mort. (PI. iv, fig. 5, 5a, 5J and 6) having the closest analogy with the Exogyra Oouloni of the Neocomian of...
Page 23 - When we were upon the high table-land, a view presented itself as boundless as the ocean. Not a tree, shrub, or any other object, either animate or inanimate, relieved the dreary monotony of the prospect; it was a vast, illimitable expanse of desert prairie — the dreaded "Llano Estacado" of New Mexico; or, in other words, the great Zahara of North America.
Page 14 - without wood". However Blake, who traversed the area with the Whipple Expedition in 1853 stated ; "The SANS BOIS mountains rise to a height of about 2,000 feet, above a heavily-timbered plain; and, as their name indicates, are nearly or quite without trees."14 H. Blake, William P., "General Report Upon the Geological Collections...

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